Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (2022)

Twin Cities campus

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Twin Cities Campus

College of Biological Sciences - Adm

College of Biological Sciences

  • Program Type: Undergraduate free-standing minor
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits in this minor: 23 to 28

Marine biology aims to understand all aspects of organisms that live in the seas, from their molecular composition and biochemistry, to how they comprise ecosystems. Consistent with this breadth, the proposed marine biology minor is an interdisciplinary curriculum through which students learn foundational concepts of marine biology, and gain perspectives about current issues that affect marine environments. Given that 71% of our planet is covered by oceans, and 95% of the readily available water is present in oceans, understanding marine chemistry, organisms, and ecosystems is an important, interdisciplinary goal. Through a combination of courses, laboratories, field-trips, internships, and study abroad experiences, students who complete the minor will gain knowledge and skills that will enrich their lives, as well as provide a base for subsequent study in marine biology.

Program Delivery

This program is available:

  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)

Admission Requirements

Students must complete 3 courses before admission to the program.

Students who have at least a 2.0 average in their math and science courses, and who have completed the following courses, will be eligible for admission to the minor.

For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.

Required prerequisites

Prerequisites

Biology course

BIOL1001-Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1003-Evolution and Biology of Sex [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1009-General Biology [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1012-Human Biology: Concepts and Current Ethical Issues [BIOL, CIV] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1055-Environmental Biology: Science and Solutions with Laboratory [BIOL, ENV] (4.0 cr)

BIOL1951-Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

(Video) Class Schedule and Browse Course Catalog

or BIOL1951H-Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

BIOL1961-Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)

Chemistry

CHEM1081-Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1065-Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

or CHEM1071H-Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1075H-Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

Minor Requirements

The marine biology minor is available to to students in the College of Biological Sciences pursuing another major in the college as well as to non-CBS students. Students must take at least one 4xxx or 5xxx course.Students who wish to declare a minor in marine biology can do so online at the College of Biological Sciences website.Directed research and internship credits earned for experiences that are directly marine biology related may be considered for inclusion in the elective category by petition.

Marine Biology Core

The marine biology core courses provide an overview of the chemistry and biology of marine organisms and marine environments. ESCI 1006 is recommended to fulfill the Oceanography requirement.Note that BIOL 2007 has a pre or co-requisite of BIOL 2005 or BIOL 3012.

FW2003-Introduction to Marine Biology (3.0 cr)

BIOL2007-Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory (1.0 cr)

BIOL2005-Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)

or BIOL3012-Animal Diversity and Evolution (4.0 cr)

ESCI1006-Oceanography [PHYS, ENV] (4.0 cr)

or ESCI1106-Oceanography [ENV] (3.0 cr)

Marine Biology Elective Courses

Students will select marine biology-related courses such as the ones listed below. Approval of elective courses will be at the discretion of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Take 6 or more credit(s) from the following:

· BIOL4590-Coral Reef Ecology (2.0 cr)

· CFAN3502-Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology (2.0 cr)

· CFAN3529-From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)

· CFAN3522-Sustainable Akumal: Turtles, tourists, cenotes and coral reefs [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)

· EEB4611-Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)

· ESCI4402-Biogeochemical Cycles in the Ocean (3.0 cr)

· ESCI4801-Geomicrobiology (3.0 cr)

(Video) Transfer Within the University Information Session

· FW4107-Principles of Fisheries Science and Management (3.0 cr)

· FW4136-Ichthyology (4.0 cr)

· FW4401-Fish Physiology and Behavior (3.0 cr)

· GCC3038-Human Threats to Ocean Health [ENV] (3.0 cr)

· Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:

· EEB5601-Limnology (3.0 cr)

· ESPM4061W-Water Quality and Natural Resources [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)

Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (2)
Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (3)
View college catalog(s):
·College of Biological Sciences
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·Marine Biology Minor

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Marine Biology Minor

Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (4)
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Information current as of September 25, 2022

BIOL1001 - Introductory Biology: Evolutionary and Ecological Perspectives (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

A one-semester exploration of the genetic, evolutionary, and ecological processes that govern biological diversity from populations to ecosystems. We explore how these processes influence human evolution, health, population growth, and conservation. We also consider how the scientific method informs our understanding of biological processes. Lab. This course is oriented towards non-majors and does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.

BIOL1003 - Evolution and Biology of Sex (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1001/Biol 1001H/Biol 1003
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course is designed as a one-semester exploration of biology from the standpoint of the evolution and biology of sex. It emphasizes scientific processes, evolution, sexual behavior, reproductive biology, and diversity with respect to sexual orientation, reproductive strategies, and gender identity. Lab activities complement these topics. This course does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.

BIOL1009 - General Biology (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1009/Biol 1009H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

A comprehensive introduction to biology - includes molecular structure of living things, cell processes, energy utilization, genetic information and inheritance, mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, and ecology. Includes lab. This comprehensive course serves as a prerequisite and requirement in many majors.

BIOL1012 - Human Biology: Concepts and Current Ethical Issues (BIOL, CIV)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1010/Biol 1015/PSTL 1135
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

One semester exploration of human anatomy and physiology within the context of ethics; topics such as human genetic diversity, organs and tissues, disease and reproduction. Weekly policy debates. Active learning format. Animal dissections required. Suitable for students in any major. Does not fulfill prerequisites for allied health grad programs.This course explores several interdisciplinary questions, each of which addresses biology through an ethical and societal lens. In ?What makes humans unique?? we will consider the evolution of human traits, how the concept of race relates to human genetic diversity, and the fallibility of human memories. In ?How does blood and organ donation work?? we will examine how our bodies can recognize and respond to foreign materials, how vaccines work, and who should have access to life saving tissue and organ transplants. In ?How do stress, diet and exercise affect health?? we will consider disparities in access to adequate nutrition, exposure to stress, and exercise, and how these affect our bodies and our mental health. Lastly, in ?How does a unique individual develop from a single cell? we will examine how a single cell develops into a fully functional human being, and how similar processes lead to cancer. We will also consider the role of genes and hormones in human reproduction and the development of reproductive structures in embryos, while explicitly addressing the ethics of the distinctions between the concepts of sex characteristics, sex assigned at birth, and gender. We will learn how a cell can become cancerous, as well as how a cell develops into a fully functioning human being. Additionally, we will consider the role of hormones in the development of male, female, and intersex organs, while being explicit about the differences between gender, sexual orientation, and sex assigned at birth. In lecture, instructors and teaching assistants will support students as they evaluate data and work through concepts in teams. Students will also dedicate significant time to the consideration of ethical questions in human biology, and work with teammates to organize and present a position on a policy related to an ethics question. In lab, students will further explore human anatomy and physiology, connecting structure and function through several dissections and activities. Students will read and share scientific papers, make observations, design experiments and analyze data. Students will work in teams to complete a multi-week project on the physiology of stress. We will continue our exploration of ethics topics in lab, where we will discuss and apply ethics in human subjects research and research on non-human animals. About ? of the course grade will be based on four traditional lecture exams and a final lab exam. The remainder of the course grade is comprised of open notes quizzes, in class team assignments, individual assignments, and team projects. Course grading is based on mastery of concepts and skills, and students are encouraged to collaborate in understanding course material.

BIOL1055 - Environmental Biology: Science and Solutions with Laboratory (BIOL, ENV)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1050/Biol 1055
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Explores science behind environmental topics. Delves into the interface of science and policy, environmental decision-making and ethics. Topics include biodiversity, env. toxicology, food production, and climate change. In lab students conduct the work of biologists, proposing hypotheses, conducting experiments, and analyzing/interpreting data. This course is intended to engage non-biology majors in the work of biology, studying current biological knowledge through evidence-based discussions of what is currently known, and by addressing science that is unknown to the students (and, at times to the biological community) through the generation and testing of hypotheses, collection and analysis of data, and practice of making data-informed conclusions.

BIOL1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS majors

(Video) First Fridays February 2022 — University of Minnesota Archives and Digital Library Services

BIOL1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS honors students

BIOL1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS majors

CHEM1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall

The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields.prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061

CHEM1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use.Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061

CHEM1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061

CHEM1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals.prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H

CHEM1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.

FW2003 - Introduction to Marine Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Nature of oceans, their role sustaining life on planet. Diversity/ecology of organisms that live in coastal, deep, open seas. Effects of humans on marine life. Resilience of marine life, its importance to human society. Cultures of oceanic peoples. Selected topics.prereq: BIOL 1001 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2002 or ESCI 1006 or ESCI 1106 or instr consent

BIOL2007 - Marine Animal Diversity Laboratory

Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Survey of marine animal diversity. Understanding major animal groups, how they relate to one another, how they differ in structure, how each group achieves survival/ reproduction in diverse environments. Lab includes dissections, including vertebrates, such as fish.Prereq/coreq: Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3012

BIOL2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3012
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Dissection, direct observation of representatives of major animal groups.

BIOL3012 - Animal Diversity and Evolution

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3012
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course is a survey of animal diversity, with an emphasis on understanding the major animal groups, how they are related to one another, how they differ in structure, and how each group achieves survival and reproduction in the diverse environments of the Earth. We will place particular emphasis on major evolutionary transitions that animals have made through their history, including the origins of multicellularity, the achievement of motion, invasion of terrestrial habitats, and the achievement of flight. We will also emphasize the science behind our contemporary understanding of animals, from multiple perspectives ? behavioral, evolutionary, physiological, and ecological. Lab requires dissection, including mammals.prereq: BIOL 1001/1001H, or BIOL 1009/1009H, or BIOL 1951/1951H

ESCI1006 - Oceanography (PHYS, ENV)

(Video) Canvas Essentials 9 1 22

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1006/ESci 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall

How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, and human interaction with the sea. Labs include study of live marine invertebrates, manipulation of oceanographic data, and discussion using videos showing unique aspects of ocean research.

ESCI1106 - Oceanography (ENV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 1006/ESci 1106
Typically offered: Every Fall

How various processes in the ocean interact. Marine biology, waves, tides, chemical oceanography, marine geology, human interaction with sea.

BIOL4590 - Coral Reef Ecology

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Contemporary issues in tropical reef ecology from diverse perspectives. Option of two-credit seminar during fall semester plus additional two-credit field option (BIOL 4596) to involve SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef.prereq: Introductory biology course with lab

CFAN3502 - Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer

Ecology of sharks and natural history of South Bimini Island. Marine ecosystems. Local flora and fauna. Local culture and development policy on the ecosystems.prereq: instr consent

CFAN3529 - From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize (GP, ENV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Introduction to key topics in wildlife medicine. Students will learn medical issues and approaches, the role of the veterinarian in wildlife conservation, zoo medicine, and wildlife rescue & rehabilitation. This program is held at the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinic⿿s (BWRC) teaching facility with BWRC⿿s founder and wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Isabelle Paquet-Durand. Labs include distance immobilization, suture, spay & neuter, necropsy, comparative anatomy, radiography, parasitology and blood analysis. Field visits are conducted with Dr. Isabelle to the Belize Zoo and to avian, reptile, primate, and manatee centers. Students are introduced to preventative medicine and common diseases for many of these species. A spay & neuter lab reviews theory and suture practice, this is followed by a spay & neuter clinic organized in the field or at BWRC. Students also have the opportunity to observe, and when possible, assist the BWRC veterinary staff during their daily operations.

CFAN3522 - Sustainable Akumal: Turtles, tourists, cenotes and coral reefs (GP, ENV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Fall Even, Spring Odd Year

This Global Campus Partner seminar addresses coastal and marine ecology as affected by tourism and development and how these affect local communities. We will explore these issues in Akumal (Mayan: place of the turtle), Mexico on the Riviera Maya. Tourism and associated development have expanded exponentially in the past decade with subsequent effects on waste management and water quality in the local cenotes, groundwater, lagoons and reefs. In addition to the water quality effects, increased use by tourist is also directly affecting sea grass, turtles and coral reefs. We will explore the ecology of these systems, methods to assess their status and impacts, and strategies to reduce or mitigate the effects in a sustainable manner that involves local populations.Prereq: CFAN 3422

EEB4611 - Biogeochemical Processes

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs).prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent

ESCI4402 - Biogeochemical Cycles in the Ocean

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: ESci 4402/ESci 8402
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Marine biogeochemistry and chemical oceanography. Processes controlling chemical composition of oceans past/present. Cycles of major/minor constituents, including carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, silicon, and oxygen and their isotopes. Role of these cycles in climate system.prereq: [CHEM 1021, CHEM 1022] or instr consent

ESCI4801 - Geomicrobiology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Geosphere/biosphere interactions over temporal/spatial scales. Global biogeochemical cycling, microbe-metal interactions, microbial paleobiology, environmental geomicrobiology, life detection, habitability of planets.prereq: One semester college level biology

FW4107 - Principles of Fisheries Science and Management

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Principles of Fisheries Management is an engaging and dynamic exploration to the principles and practices of fisheries management. The course is designed as a major requirement for Fisheries subplan majors in Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology. It is also appropriate as an elective course for other majors and minors in FWCB, ESPM, or related biological disciplines. We cover the basics of fisheries science (habitats, ecology, and population dynamics) and management (e.g., goals, tools, implementation, and assessment) with an emphasis on human intervention and regulation. We first cover management approaches and planning, the development of an information base, and the identification of problems. We then provide a brief overview of applied limnology, fish ecology, and population dynamics, followed by approaches to manage fishery populations and habitats in freshwater and marine systems along with methods to assess management outcomes. Throughout, we demonstrate applications to specific fisheries and habitats. This is primarily a lecture-based course that also integrates field trips, group discussions, and activities. We use exams to measure comprehension, and case studies and assignments to encourage practical application. Prerequisite: Intro biology course, [jr or sr]

FW4136 - Ichthyology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes.prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012

FW4401 - Fish Physiology and Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Fish mechanisms/behavior. Links between fish biology, fisheries ecology, management, aquaculture. Homeostasis, neurobiology, bioenergetics, reproduction, movement.prereq: 4136, BIOL 2012, CHEM 1021(may be taken concurrently)

GCC3038 - Human Threats to Ocean Health (ENV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Human Threats to Ocean HealthThis grand challenge course addresses the scope of the anthropogenic alterations in natural biogeochemical cycling (BGCC) of oceans that will help the students to develop strategies to intervene, advocate, and sustain planetary health for all of humanity. The following grand challenge questions will be addressed: (1) How does Ocean Biogeochemical Cycling (BGCC) of nutrients support global ecosystems and biodiversity? (2) What human (anthropogenic) activities disrupt ocean BGCC of nutrients, resulting in depletion of biodiversity, ecosystem health, ecosystem services, and environmental justice for humans? (3) What do humans have to do to protect the future of ocean health and all of humanity?Global recycling of nutrients and metals within the environment (geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere) and the biosphere are essential for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services on which all of humanity depends. Living organisms extract and transform nutrients for their metabolism, growth, and reproduction, ultimately releasing these nutrients (often in a transformed state) back to the inanimate sphere via biogeochemical cycling (BGCC) driven by energy transformations. In natural environments, BGCC maintains a dynamic equilibrium/homeostasis between abiotic and biotic spheres, a process essential for survival of life on Earth. However, the current human practices have caused massive changes in the BGCC of nutrients, thus disrupting the natural cycling and (i) threatening the biosphere?s nutrient availability and (ii) precipitating many of the current environmental problems such as climate change, nitrogen pollution, ocean acidification, acid rain, mercury deposition, etc. At the current scale of human development, these alterations to the BGCC in the oceans may seriously damage the environment and biodiversity, thus threatening the entire Planet?s future. Further, the adverse effects of the loss of ecosystem services may not be shared equally amongst society, whereby access to a healthy environment is increasingly distributed by power, class, and race. An understanding of these inequities and incorporation of environmental justice in eco-centric environmental advocacy will be essential for sustaining the health of our planet. Therefore, the students registering for this course will develop an understanding and the scope of the anthropogenic alterations in natural biogeochemical cycling of oceans that will help them develop strategies to intervene, advocate, and sustain planetary health for all of humanity. The specific aims are following: (1) Describe global and local mechanisms of natural BGCC on Earth and connection to the oceans; (2) Explain human impacts on BGCC, and relationships between abnormal BGCC and nutrient distribution in water, sediment, and air; (3) Determine impact of human-altered ocean nutrient cycling on society, including members disproportionately impacted by environmental issues and underrepresented in environmental movements; (4) Strategize sustainable strategies to mitigate the health and environmental problems associated with abnormal biogeochemical nutrient cycling, bringing environmental justice perspectives to the forefront; and (5) Convince students that positive actions made now can and will impact the future.This course will focus on multiple vectors of inquiry (i.e., chemistry, toxicology, environment science and justice, sustainability and biodiversity), and students' progress through the course will give them powerful tools to confront the Grand Challenges of our age, global change in biogeochemical cycles.This is a Grand Challenge Curriculum course.

EEB5601 - Limnology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Advanced introduction to description/analysis of interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that control functioning of life in lakes and other freshwater aquatic environments.prereq: Grad student or instr consent

(Video) What Classes do I need to take?

ESPM4061W - Water Quality and Natural Resources (ENV, WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Water quality decision making. International focus. Ecology of aquatic ecosystems, how they are valuable to society and changed by landscape management. Case studies, impaired waters, TMDL process, student engagement in simulating water quality decision making.

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