Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (2022)

Twin Cities campus

Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (1)

Twin Cities Campus

College of Biological Sciences - Adm

College of Biological Sciences

  • Program Type: Baccalaureate
  • Requirements for this program are current for Fall 2022
  • Required credits to graduate with this degree: 120
  • Required credits within the major: 73 to 85
  • Degree: Bachelor of Science

Students majoring in biology gain a broad understanding of the fundamental nature and characteristics of living things and the ways in which they interact. Their studies cover the full range of life sciences, from cancer genes to acid rain, and from lichens to marine mammals.The biology BS program prepares students for study in a broad spectrum of biological sciences, professional training programs in the health sciences, careers in teaching, and entry-level scientist positions in industry, government agencies, and universities.

Program Delivery

This program is available:

  • via classroom (the majority of instruction is face-to-face)

Admission Requirements

A GPA above 2.0 is preferred for the following:

  • 2.50 transferring from another University of Minnesota college
  • 2.50 transferring from outside the University

Students completing another major in the College of Biological Sciences are not eligible for the BS in biology. In addition, students completing a degree in biology are not eligible for the following CBS minors, due to overlap: behavioral biology, biochemistry, cellular and molecular neuroscience, integrative neuroscience, microbiology, and plant biology.

For information about University of Minnesota admission requirements, visit the Office of Admissions website.

General Requirements

All students in baccalaureate degree programs are required to complete general University and college requirements including writing and liberal education courses. For more information about University-wide requirements, see the liberal education requirements. Required courses for the major, minor or certificate in which a student receives a D grade (with or without plus or minus) do not count toward the major, minor or certificate (including transfer courses).

Program Requirements

At least 17 upper division credits in the major must be taken at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus.

Foundational Courses

Nature of Life/Nature of Science and Research

BIOL1805-Nature of Life: Introducing New Students to the Biological Sciences (0.5 cr)

BIOL1806-Nature of Life, Part Two (0.5 cr)

BIOL2905-Nature of Life, Part III (0.5 cr)

BIOL2906-Nature of Life, Part IV (0.5 cr)

or This track (BIOL 3001) is for transfer students only.

BIOL3001-Nature of Science and Research (1.0 cr)

Foundations of Biology

BIOL1951-Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

or BIOL1951H-Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (4.0 cr)

BIOL1961-Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors [BIOL] (2.0 cr)

BIOL2003-Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II (3.0 cr)

or BIOL2003H-Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II (3.0 cr)

BIOL3004-Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II Laboratory (3.0 cr)

Quantitative Requirements

MATH1241-Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology [MATH] (4.0 cr)

or MATH1271-Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)

or MATH1371-CSE Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)

or MATH1571H-Honors Calculus I [MATH] (4.0 cr)

Take 1 or more course(s) from the following:

· CSCI1133-Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)

· CSCI1133H-Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts (4.0 cr)

· CSCI3003-Introduction to Computing in Biology (3.0 cr)

· MATH1272-Calculus II (4.0 cr)

· MATH1572H-Honors Calculus II (4.0 cr)

· MATH2241-Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems (3.0 cr)

· STAT3011-Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· BIOL3272-Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)

or BIOL3272H-Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)

or BIOL5272-Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)

Chemistry

Track 1: Preferred CBS Chemistry Sequence

CHEM1081-Chemistry for the Life Sciences I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1065-Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM1082-Chemistry for the Life Sciences II (3.0 cr)

CHEM1086-Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory (1.0 cr)

CHEM2081-Chemistry for the Life Sciences III (3.0 cr)

CHEM2085-Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory (2.0 cr)

or Track 2

This track is allowable for students entering CBS with previous chemistry credit or for whom space is not available in the preferred track. Students should speak with a CBS academic advisor to determine eligibility for this track.

CHEM1061-Chemical Principles I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1065-Chemical Principles I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM1062-Chemical Principles II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1066-Chemical Principles II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM2301-Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)

or Track 2 (Honors Option)

This track is allowable for CBS honors students.

CHEM1071H-Honors Chemistry I [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1075H-Honors Chemistry I Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM1072H-Honors Chemistry II [PHYS] (3.0 cr)

CHEM1076H-Honors Chemistry II Laboratory [PHYS] (1.0 cr)

CHEM2331H-Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I (3.0 cr)

Physics

PHYS1221-Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I [PHYS] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1301W-Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1401V-Honors Physics I [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

PHYS1222-Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II [PHYS] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1302W-Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

or PHYS1402V-Honors Physics II [PHYS, WI] (4.0 cr)

CBS Content Areas

At least one course is required from 6 out of the 6 Content Areas.

Take 6 or more sub-requirements(s) from the following:

Content Area A: Ecology

Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:

· EEB3407-Ecology (3.0 cr)

· EEB3408W-Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB4609W-Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)

· EEB4611-Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)

· PMB4121-Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)

· Content Area B: Evolution

Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:

· EEB3002-Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)

· EEB3409-Evolution (3.0 cr)

· EEB5409-Evolution (3.0 cr)

· Content Area C: Organismal Biology

Take 1 - 2 course(s) from the following:

· BIOL3211-Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)

· EEB4134-Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)

· GCD4161-Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)

· MICB3301-Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)

· MICB3303-Biology of Microorganisms (without laboratory) (3.0 cr)

· PMB3007W-Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PMB3212-Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own (3.0 cr)

· PMB4111-Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)

· PMB5212-Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own (3.0 cr)

· PMB3002-Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)

PMB3005W-Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)

· Content Area D: Biochemistry

Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:

· BIOC3022-Biochemistry for Life Scientists (3.0 cr)

· BIOC4331-Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems (4.0 cr)

· Content Area E: Genetics

Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:

· BIOL4003-Genetics (3.0 cr)

· PMB4131-Prokaryotic Genetics (3.0 cr)

· Content Area F: Cell Biology

Take exactly 1 course(s) from the following:

· BIOC4332-Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression (4.0 cr)

· BIOL4004-Cell Biology (3.0 cr)

· MICB4171-Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses (3.0 cr)

· PMB4516W-Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)

Biology Major-Specific Coursework

BIOL 2005 must be paired with 3211 to count for elective credit.

Take 16 or more credit(s) from the following:

Laboratory and Field Courses

Electives must include 2 lab/field courses from the approved list. To count as a lab/field course, directed research must be a minimum of 3 credits; credits can be split over multiple terms using 4994, 4794W, or a combination. Students may use a maximum of 7 credits of directed research toward a CBS degree. Directed research can only be used for one lab/field course. In order to count toward the lab/field course, Itasca courses (48xx) must be 2 credits or greater.

Take 2 or more course(s) from the following:

· BIOC4025W-Laboratory in Biochemistry [WI] (2.0 cr)

· BIOC4125-Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (3.0 cr)

· BIOC4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOC4994-Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL4994-Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)

· CFAN3502-Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology (2.0 cr)

· CFAN3529-From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize [GP, ENV] (3.0 cr)

· COP4794W-Writing Intensive Directed Research [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· COP4994-Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB3407-Ecology (3.0 cr)

· EEB3408W-Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB3411-Introduction to Animal Behavior (3.0 cr)

· EEB3412W-Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB3807-Ecology (4.0 cr)

· EEB3811W-Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB4129-Mammalogy (4.0 cr)

· EEB4134-Introduction to Ornithology (4.0 cr)

· EEB4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB4839-Field Studies in Mammalogy (4.0 cr)

· EEB4994-Directed Research (1.0-6.0 cr)

· EEB5407-Ecology (3.0 cr)

· EEB5409-Evolution (3.0 cr)

· FW4136-Ichthyology (4.0 cr)

· GCD3485-Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins (4.0 cr)

· GCD4025-Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory (3.0 cr)

· GCD4111-Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization (4.0 cr)

· GCD4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· GCD4994-Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)

· GCD5005-Computer Programming for Biology (3.0 cr)

· MICB3301-Biology of Microorganisms (5.0 cr)

· MICB4215-Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)

· MICB4225W-Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)

· MICB4235-Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics (3.0 cr)

· MICB4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· MICB4994-Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)

· NSC5551-Itasca Cell and Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory (4.0 cr)

· NSC5561-Systems Neuroscience (4.0 cr)

· NSCI4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)

· NSCI4994-Directed Research (1.0-6.0 cr)

· PMB3005W-Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)

· PMB3007W-Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PMB4321-Minnesota Flora (3.0 cr)

· PMB4511-Flowering Plant Diversity (3.0 cr)

· PMB4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· PMB4994-Directed Research (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL3012-Animal Diversity and Evolution (4.0 cr)

· EEB5534-Biodiversity Sci: The origins, maintenance, consequences, detection and assessment of biodiversity [ENV] (3.0 cr)

· BIOL3211-Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)

BIOL2005-Animal Diversity Laboratory (2.0 cr)

· EEB3409-Evolution (3.0 cr)

or EEB5409-Evolution (3.0 cr)

· PMB3802-Field Microbiology at Itasca Biological Research Station (3.0 cr)

or PMB5802-Field Microbiology at Itasca Biological Research Station (3.0 cr)

· PMB3812-Field Mycology (3.0 cr)

or PMB5812-Field Mycology (3.0 cr)

· Additional Electives

Take 0 - 13 credit(s) from the following:

· BIOC4225-Laboratory in NMR Techniques (1.0 cr)

· BIOC4325-Laboratory in Mass Spectrometry (1.0 cr)

· BIOC4331-Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems (4.0 cr)

· BIOC4332-Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression (4.0 cr)

· BIOC4351-Protein Engineering (3.0 cr)

· BIOC4521-Introduction to Physical Biochemistry (3.0 cr)

· BIOC4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

(Video) Class Schedule and Browse Course Catalog

· BIOC4960-Special Topics in Biochemistry (3.0 cr)

· BIOC4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOC5309-Biocatalysis and Biodegradation (3.0 cr)

· BIOC5352-Biotechnology and Bioengineering for Biochemists (3.0 cr)

· BIOC5361-Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics (3.0 cr)

· BIOC5528-Spectroscopy and Kinetics (4.0 cr)

· BIOC5535-Introduction to Modern Structural Biology -- Diffraction (2.0 cr)

· BIOC5536-Introduction to Modern Structural Biology - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (2.0 cr)

· BIOL3015-Molecular Biology (2.0 cr)

· BIOL3025-Molecular Biology and Society [TS] (3.0 cr)

· BIOL3211-Physiology of Humans and Other Animals (3.0 cr)

· BIOL3503-Biology of Aging (2.0 cr)

· BIOL3600-Directed Instruction (1.0-2.0 cr)

· BIOL3700-Undergraduate Seminar (1.0-3.0 cr)

· BIOL4201-Teaching in the Biology Laboratory (1.0 cr)

· BIOL4590-Coral Reef Ecology (2.0 cr)

· BIOL4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL4950-Special Topics in Biology (1.0-4.0 cr)

· BIOL4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL5309-Molecular Ecology And Ecological Genomics (3.0 cr)

· CHEM4412-Chemical Biology of Enzymes (3.0 cr)

· COP4793W-Writing Intensive Directed Studies [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· COP4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB3500-Special Topics in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior (1.0-3.0 cr)

· EEB3603-Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments (3.0 cr)

· EEB3701-EEB Seminar (1.0 cr)

· EEB4068-Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)

· EEB4329-Primate Ecology and Social Behavior (3.0 cr)

· EEB4330W-Animal Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)

· EEB4609W-Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)

· EEB4611-Biogeochemical Processes (3.0 cr)

· EEB4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB5042-Quantitative Genetics (3.0 cr)

· EEB5053-Ecology: Theory and Concepts (4.0 cr)

· EEB5068-Plant Physiological Ecology (3.0 cr)

· EEB5609-Ecosystem Ecology (3.0 cr)

· GCD3486-Personal Genome Analysis (3.0 cr)

· GCD4034-Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)

· GCD4143-Human Genetics and Genomics (3.0 cr)

· GCD4151-Molecular Biology of Cancer (3.0 cr)

· GCD4161-Developmental Biology (3.0 cr)

· GCD4171-Stem Cells in Biology and Medicine (3.0 cr)

· GCD4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· GCD4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· GCD5036-Molecular Cell Biology (3.0 cr)

· MATH5445-Mathematical Analysis of Biological Networks (4.0 cr)

· MATH5447-Theoretical Neuroscience (4.0 cr)

· MICB3303-Biology of Microorganisms (without laboratory) (3.0 cr)

· MICB4131-Immunology (3.0 cr)

· MICB4151-Molecular and Genetic Bases for Microbial Diseases (3.0 cr)

· MICB4161W-Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)

· MICB4171-Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses (3.0 cr)

· MICB4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· MICB4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· MICE5035-Personal Microbiome Analysis (3.0 cr)

· NSC5031W-Perception [WI] (3.0 cr)

· NSC5040-Brain Networks: From Connectivity to Dynamics (4.0 cr)

· NSC5202-Theoretical Neuroscience: Systems and Information Processing (3.0 cr)

· NSC5203-Basic and Clinical Vision Science (3.0 cr)

· NSC5461-Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (3.0 cr)

· NSC5462-Neuroscience Principles of Drug Abuse (2.0 cr)

· NSC5540-Survey of Biomedical Neuroscience (2.0 cr)

· NSC5661-Behavioral Neuroscience (3.0 cr)

· NSCI3001W-Neuroscience and Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)

· NSCI3101-Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems (3.0 cr)

· NSCI3102W-Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)

· NSCI4101-Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms (3.0 cr)

· NSCI4150-Advanced Topics in Neuroscience (3.0 cr)

· NSCI4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)

· NSCI4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· PHCL4001-Mechanisms of Drug Action (2.0 cr)

· PMB3002-Plant Biology: Function (2.0 cr)

· PMB3701-PMB Seminar (1.0 cr)

· PMB4111-Microbial Physiology and Diversity (3.0 cr)

· PMB4121-Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology (3.0 cr)

· PMB4131-Prokaryotic Genetics (3.0 cr)

· PMB4516W-Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PMB4601-Topics in Plant Biochemistry (3.0 cr)

· PMB4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· PMB4993-Directed Studies (1.0-7.0 cr)

· PMB5601-Topics in Plant Biochemistry (3.0 cr)

· EEB3002-Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)

or ANTH3002-Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology (4.0 cr)

· BIOC5444-Muscle (3.0 cr)

or PHSL5444-Muscle (3.0 cr)

· PMB4412-Plant Physiology and Development (3.0 cr)

or PMB5412-Plant Physiology and Development (3.0 cr)

· PMB3212-Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own (3.0 cr)

or PMB5212-Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own (3.0 cr)

· BIOL3272H-Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)

or BIOL3272-Applied Biostatistics (4.0 cr)

· Biology in Context

Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:

· BIOL2996-Directed Introduction to Research (1.0 cr)

· BIOL3610-Internship: Professional Experience in Biological Sciences (1.0-6.0 cr)

· BIOL3905-Beyond the Nobel Prize: Examining the Evolution of Swedish Innovation [GP] (3.0 cr)

· BIOL4960H-Thesis Writing in the Biological Sciences: Developing the Literature Review (1.0 cr)

· GCC 3xxx

· GCC 5xxx

· NSCI3001W-Neuroscience and Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)

· NSCI3505W-Mind and Brain [WI] (4.0 cr)

· Additional STEM Electives

Take 0 - 4 credit(s) from the following:

· CHEM2311-Organic Lab (4.0 cr)

· CHEM4001-Chemistry of Biomass and Biomass Conversion to Fuels and Products [ENV] (4.0 cr)

· CSCI3081W-Program Design and Development [WI] (4.0 cr)

· ESCI4102W-Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates [WI] (3.0 cr)

· ESCI4103W-Fossil Record of Mammals [WI] (3.0 cr)

· MATH3283W-Sequences, Series, and Foundations: Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)

· STAT3011-Introduction to Statistical Analysis [MATH] (4.0 cr)

· STAT3021-Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3.0 cr)

· STAT3022-Data Analysis (4.0 cr)

· STAT4101-Theory of Statistics I (4.0 cr)

· STAT4102-Theory of Statistics II (4.0 cr)

· CHEM2302-Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)

or CHEM2332H-Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II (3.0 cr)

Upper Division Writing Intensive within the Major

Students are required to take one upper division writing intensive course within the major. If that requirement has not been satisfied with the core major requirements, students must choose one course from the following list. Some of these courses may also fulfill other major requirements.

Take 0 - 1 course(s) from the following:

· BIOC4025W-Laboratory in Biochemistry [WI] (2.0 cr)

· BIOC4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOC4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL4321W-Deconstructing Research: Writing about Biological Research for Non-scientists [WI] (2.0 cr)

· BIOL4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· BIOL4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· COP4793W-Writing Intensive Directed Studies [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· COP4794W-Writing Intensive Directed Research [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB3408W-Ecology [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB3412W-Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB3811W-Animal Behavior in the Field [WI] (4.0 cr)

· EEB4330W-Animal Communication [WI] (3.0 cr)

· EEB4609W-Ecosystem Ecology [ENV, WI] (3.0 cr)

· EEB4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· EEB4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· GCD4005W-Cell Biology-Writing Intensive [WI] (4.0 cr)

· GCD4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· GCD4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· MICB4161W-Eukaryotic Microbiology [WI] (3.0 cr)

· MICB4225W-Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics [WI] (3.0 cr)

· MICB4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· MICB4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· NSCI3001W-Neuroscience and Society [CIV, WI] (4.0 cr)

· NSCI3102W-Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior [WI] (3.0 cr)

· NSCI3505W-Mind and Brain [WI] (4.0 cr)

· NSCI4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)

· NSCI4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-6.0 cr)

· PMB3005W-Plant Function Laboratory [WI] (2.0 cr)

· PMB3007W-Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation [WI] (4.0 cr)

· PMB4516W-Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive [WI] (3.0 cr)

· PMB4793W-Directed Studies: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

· PMB4794W-Directed Research: Writing Intensive [WI] (1.0-7.0 cr)

Program Sub-plans

A sub-plan is not required for this program.

Integrated BS/MPH-Environmental Health

The College of Biological Sciences (CBS) and the School of Public Health (SPH) offer an early-admission opportunity for eligible CBS students interested in pursuing the Environmental Health MPH degree.The MPH program in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences emphasizes the scientific, technological, policy, and management skills required to address environmental health concerns. These concerns include investigating health hazards in our environment, protecting worker health, and establishing the basis for public health policy. The Division of Environmental Health is committed to graduating professionals with interdisciplinary training, which includes practicing innovative problem solving, and gaining experience with a diversity of approaches and applications. To be eligible for this program, applicants must be admitted undergraduate students in the College of Biological Sciences, have completed at least 60+ credits, and have a GPA of a least 3.25

Students admitted to the Integrated BS/MPH-Environmental Health program take 12 MPH credits during their senior year, and complete the MPH by taking remaining credits as a full-time graduate student in the summer and academic year after completing their undergraduate degree.Graduate courses cannot be applied toward both BS and MPH credit and degree requirements. Admitted students must maintain timely degree progress to ensure that the BS degree is awarded no later than the end of the senior year. The application deadline for the Integrated BS/MPH-Environmental Health opportunity is the spring of the applicant's junior year. Interested students should consult with their CBS academic advisor or School of Public Health for application instructions.

Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (2)
Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (3)
View college catalog(s):
·College of Biological Sciences View sample plan(s):
·Biology (with Chem 1081 track)
·Biology (with Chem 1061 track)
·Biology (with Chem 1015 track)
·Integrated BS/MPH-EnvHlth Sample Plan

View checkpoint chart:
·Biology B.S.

View PDF Version:

Biology B.S.

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Program Details : University Catalogs : University of Minnesota (6)

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Information current as of September 25, 2022

BIOL1805 - Nature of Life: Introducing New Students to the Biological Sciences

Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Building on incoming student summer programming to get started in the Biological Sciences in CBS. Providing transition programming, academic success tools, college learning, and guidance as a foundation for success in the biological sciences. Introduction to the College of Biological Sciences community and opportunities through class content, guild activities, and peer mentoring.prereq: Fr in College of Biological Sciences

BIOL1806 - Nature of Life, Part Two

Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Second semester of Nature of Life with focus on building intentional pathway in CBS/student success/engagement.prereq: 1805

BIOL2905 - Nature of Life, Part III

Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Reflect on aspirations, personal characteristics, experiences. Resources/practical tools to reach educational/professional goals. Special focus on developing personal/professional goals, articulating personal experiences in light of aspirations.prereq: 1805, 1806

BIOL2906 - Nature of Life, Part IV

Credits: 0.5 [max 0.5]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Reflect on aspirations, personal characteristics, experiences. Resources/practical tools to reach educational/professional goals. Special focus on developing personal/professional goals, articulating personal experiences in light of aspirations.prereq: 2905

BIOL3001 - Nature of Science and Research

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Explore how to read/use research papers. Role of research ethics. Financial, legal, regulatory oversight on research/other topics. **This course is for new CBS transfer students from other institutions.prereq: College-level biology

BIOL1951 - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS majors

BIOL1951H - Foundations of Biology Lecture I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 1951/H/Biol 2002/H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951H and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS honors students

BIOL1961 - Foundations of Biology Lab I for Biological Sciences Majors (BIOL)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Core biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Emphasizes evolution, organismal diversity, and genetics within context of problem solving/applications. Students must take both BIOL 1951 and BIOL 1961 to be awarded the Biological Sciences LE.This course is required for all CBS majors

BIOL2003 - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2003/Biol 2003H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Second of two courses. Biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Ecology/biochemistry concepts within problem solving/application.

BIOL2003H - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2003/Biol 2003H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Second of two courses. Biological concepts, from biomolecules to ecosystems. Ecology/biochemistry concepts within problem solving/application.

BIOL3004 - Foundations of Biology for Biological Sciences Majors, Part II Laboratory

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3004/Biol 3004H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course follows BIOL 1961 and is required for all CBS majors. Students design and perform research projects that will require an additional 4-to-6 hours per week of work outside of class; times to be arranged. Each section is devoted to a single research area; check the section details to see which sections correspond to each research area. Research projects in zebrafish environmental toxicology and zebrafish microbiome sections will require in-person work in the BIOL 3004 laboratory. Only students with previous command line coding experience should enroll for a computational microbiology section. All projects involve applying quantitative skills, scientific method, and modern biological tools to real-world questions.Prerequisite is Foundations of Biology Lab I: BIOL 1961, 1961H, 2002, or 2002H AND CHEM 1021, 1061, 1071H, or 1081. Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: BIOL 3004H.

MATH1241 - Calculus and Dynamical Systems in Biology (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Differential/integral calculus with biological applications. Discrete/continuous dynamical systems. Models from fields such as ecology/evolution, epidemiology, physiology, genetic networks, neuroscience, and biochemistry.prereq: [4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]], CBS student

MATH1271 - Calculus I (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Differential calculus of functions of a single variable, including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trig functions. Applications, including optimization and related rates problems. Single variable integral calculus, using anti-derivatives and simple substitution. Applications may include area, volume, work problems.prereq: 4 yrs high school math including trig or satisfactory score on placement test or grade of at least C- in [1151 or 1155]

MATH1371 - CSE Calculus I (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Differentiation of single-variable functions, basics of integration of single-variable functions. Applications: max-min, related rates, area, curve-sketching. Use of calculator, cooperative learning.prereq: CSE or pre-bioprod concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in biosys engn (PRE), background in [precalculus, geometry, visualization of functions/graphs], instr consent; familiarity with graphing calculators recommended

MATH1571H - Honors Calculus I (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1271/Math 1281/Math 1371/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Differential/integral calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes hard problem-solving rather than theory.prereq: Honors student and permission of University Honors Program

CSCI1133 - Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Fundamental programming concepts using Python language. Problem solving skills, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Use of abstractions/modularity. Data structures/abstract data types. Develop programs to solve real-world problems.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H or instr consent

CSCI1133H - Honors Introduction to Computing and Programming Concepts

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 1133/CSci 1133H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Programming concepts using Python language. Real world problem solving, recursion, object-oriented programming. Algorithm development techniques. Abstractions/modularity. Optional honors topics: programming robots, programming paradigms, artificial intelligence.prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1271 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1371 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in MATH 1571H], CSci majors, pre-majors in CSE/CLA, honors student

CSCI3003 - Introduction to Computing in Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3003/CSci 5465
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

This course builds computational skills needed to carry out basic data analysis tasks common in modern biology. Students will learn computing concepts (algorithm development, data structures, complexity analysis) along with practical programming skills in Python and R. No previous programming knowledge assumed. Prereq: introductory biology course.

MATH1272 - Calculus II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Techniques of integration. Calculus involving transcendental functions, polar coordinates. Taylor polynomials, vectors/curves in space, cylindrical/spherical coordinates.prereq: [1271 or equiv] with grade of at least C-

MATH1572H - Honors Calculus II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 1272/Math 1282/Math 1372/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Continuation of 1571. Infinite series, differential calculus of several variables, introduction to linear algebra.prereq: 1571H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program

MATH2241 - Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems

Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Development, analysis and simulation of models for the dynamics of biological systems. Mathematical topics include discrete and continuous dynamical systems, linear algebra, and probability. Models from fields such as ecology, epidemiology, physiology, genetics, neuroscience, and biochemistry. prereq: [1241 or 1271 or 1371] w/grade of at least C-

STAT3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.

BIOL3272 - Applied Biostatistics

Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab.prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended

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BIOL3272H - Applied Biostatistics

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab.prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.

BIOL5272 - Applied Biostatistics

Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab. prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.

CHEM1081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall

The topics of atomic theory, molecular structure, bonding and shape, energy and enthalpy, gases, properties of solutions, and equilibrium will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields.prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1015 or passing chemistry placement exam. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061

CHEM1082 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

The topics of acids, bases and equilibrium, kinetics, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, free radicals, electrochemistry, and alkene addition reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab); concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1086; registration for 1086 must precede registration for 1082. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM1086 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences II Laboratory

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions. Techniques include computational chemistry, isolation of natural products, chromatography, acid-base titrations, preparation of buffers, study of reaction kinetics, and examination of polymer degration. Prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1081 (lecture) and CHEM 1065 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 1082 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM2081 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

The topics of spectroscopy, conjugation and aromaticity, carbonyl and their reactivity, carboxylic acid derivatives, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions will be presented along with their application to biological systems. Intended to provide a strong chemistry background for students pursuing life science related majors or careers in life science related fields.prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM2085 - Chemistry for the Life Sciences III Laboratory

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Experimental techniques and instrumentation applied to the study of chemical reactions and related biological systems. Techniques include spectroscopy, isolation, kinetics and thermodynamics, green chemistry, oxidations, enzymatic reductions, drug discovery. prereq: grade of a C- or better in CHEM 1082 (lecture) and CHEM 1086 (lab). Concurrent registration in CHEM 2081 is required. This course is recommended for CBS majors.

CHEM1061 - Chemical Principles I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Atomic theory, periodic properties of elements. Thermochemistry, reaction stoichiometry. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure/bonding. Organic chemistry and polymers. energy sources, environmental issues related to energy use.Prereq-Grade of at least C- in [1011 or 1015] or [passing placement exam, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065]; intended for science or engineering majors; concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1065; registration for 1065 must precede registration for 1061

CHEM1065 - Chemical Principles I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1061

CHEM1062 - Chemical Principles II (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Chemical kinetics. Radioactive decay. Chemical equilibrium. Solutions. Acids/bases. Solubility. Second law of thermodynamics. Electrochemistry/corrosion. Descriptive chemistry of elements. Coordination chemistry. Biochemistry.prereq: Grade of at least C- in 1061 or equiv, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1066; registration for 1066 must precede registration for 1062

CHEM1066 - Chemical Principles II Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Basic laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and proper treatment of hazardous wastes.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1062

CHEM2301 - Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Organic compounds, constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Molecular structure. Chemical reactivity/properties. Spectroscopic characterization of organic molecules.prereq: C- or better in 1062/1066 or 1072H/1076H

CHEM1071H - Honors Chemistry I (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1061/Chem 1071H/Chem 1081
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Advanced introduction to atomic theory. Periodic properties of elements. Behavior of gases, liquids, and solids. Molecular/ionic structure, bonding. Aspects of organic chemistry, spectroscopy, and polymers. Mathematically demanding quantitative problems. Writing for scientific journals.prereq: Honors student, permission of University Honors Program, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1075H; registration for 1075H must precede registration for 1071H

CHEM1075H - Honors Chemistry I Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1065/Chem 1075H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Develop laboratory skills while investigating physical and chemical phenomena closely linked to lecture material. Experimental design, data collection and treatment, discussion of errors, and the proper treatment of hazardous wastes. Prereq-&1071H, honors student, permission of University Honors Program.

CHEM1072H - Honors Chemistry II (PHYS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1062/Chem 1072H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Advanced introduction. Chemical kinetics/reaction mechanisms, chemical/physical equilibria, acids/bases, entropy/second law of thermodynamics, electrochemistry/corrosion; descriptive chemistry of elements; coordination chemistry; biochemistry.prereq: 1071H, concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1076H, honors student, registration for 1076H must precede registration for 1072H

CHEM1076H - Honors Chemistry II Laboratory (PHYS)

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 1066/Chem 1076H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Develop laboratory skills as experiments become increasingly complex. Data collection/treatment, discussion of errors, proper treatment of hazardous wastes, experiment design.prereq: concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 1072H

CHEM2331H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2301/Chem 2331H
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Important classes of organic compounds, their constitutions, configurations, conformations, reactions. Relationships between molecular structure/chemical properties/reactivities. Spectroscopic methods/characterization of organic molecules.prereq: At least B+ in 1072H, UHP student

PHYS1221 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors I (PHYS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The living world exists in the physical universe, and a complete understanding of biological processes is impossible without a firm foundation in the basic physical principles to which all systems, living and inorganic, must adhere. The basic principles of classical mechanics, fluid mechanics, and oscillations and waves will be examined, with particular emphasis to their application in biological systems, using mathematical analysis at the level of basic calculus.prereq: High School or College Calculus

PHYS1301W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering I (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, structure of matter. Applications to mechanical systems.Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1371H or equivalent

PHYS1401V - Honors Physics I (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1201W/1301W/1401V/1501V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Comprehensive, calculus-level general physics. Emphasizes use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles. Structure of matter, with applications to mechanical systems.Prereq: Honors program or with permission, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1271/1371/1571H or equivalent

PHYS1222 - Introductory Physics for Life Science Majors II (PHYS)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

This is the second course in the introductory physics sequence for life science majors. The class exposes the student to physical principles and concepts, demonstrates how these principles can be applied to quantitatively describe natural phenomena, and provides the student with an opportunity to perform hands-on experiments and measurements that model how physical knowledge is obtained. The fundamental principles of thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and nuclear physics are considered.prereq: PHYS 1221 or equivalent

PHYS1302W - Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering II (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Use of fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Motion, forces, conservation principles, fields, structure of matter. Applications to electromagnetic phenomena.Prereq: PHYS 1301 or equivalent, Prereq or Concurrent: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent

PHYS1402V - Honors Physics II (PHYS, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phys 1202W/1302W/1402V/1502V
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Fundamental principles to solve quantitative problems. Description of motion, forces, conservation principles, fields. Structure of matter, with applications to electro-magnetic phenomena.Honors program or with permission, PHYS 1401V or equivalent, Prereq or CC: MATH 1272/1372/1572H or equivalent

EEB3407 - Ecology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer

Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.

EEB3408W - Ecology (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring

Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R).prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]

EEB4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems.

EEB4611 - Biogeochemical Processes

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs).prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent

PMB4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products.prereq: 3301

EEB3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.

EEB3409 - Evolution

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3409/Biol 3809/Biol 5409/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab.prereq: One semester college biology

EEB5409 - Evolution

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab.prereq: One semester college biology

BIOL3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/AnSc 3303W/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format.prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]

EEB4134 - Introduction to Ornithology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip.prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012

GCD4161 - Developmental Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Developmental biology is the study of the process by which organisms grow and develop from embryo to adult. This field encompasses the biology of morphogenesis, differentiation, regeneration, metamorphosis, and the growth and differentiation of stem cells. Topics focus primarily on animal development to include fertilization, cell specification, body patterning, stem cells, neurogenesis, organogenesis, limb formation, regeneration, sex determination, and developmental timing, as well as environmental impacts on development. Students will learn about genetic models such as fruit flies, nematodes, fish, mice, and plants. Coverage will be extended to human development and disease as appropriate. prereq: BIOL 4003; also recommended prerequisite: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W

MICB3301 - Biology of Microorganisms

Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab.prereq: [Biol 1961 and Biol 2003] or Biol 1009 or instructor permission

MICB3303 - Biology of Microorganisms (without laboratory)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, infectious disease, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to function of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses.prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 or instructor permission

PMB3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus.prereq: One semester college biology

PMB3212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3212/PMB 5212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

No matter how you classify life on Earth, the fungi are in a Kingdom of their own. Latest estimates of the number of fungal species on our planet are between 2.2 and 3.8 million species. The diversity of single-celled and multi-cellular fungi is staggering, the result of divergence within a group of aquatic eukaryotes one billion years ago (± 500 million years). That divergence ultimately gave rise to animals and fungi, but the diversification within the fungal lineages is unrivaled. They can be found in aerobic and anaerobic environments. They are found on every Continent, recycling and reallocating vast amounts of nutrients in every Biome. They cause problems in crops but are also used to make food, with ancient processes such as fermentation and mushroom cultivation. For these reasons, mycology (study of fungi) is increasingly popular among students with interests as diverse as their fungal subjects. With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing to sample entire communities, we are seeing fungi in all of these places where they were previously invisible. The fungal role in Earth's most critical processes is, right now, coming into light. It is an exciting time to study Kingdom Fungi.This course uses a format of lecture, discussion, and field trips to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a solid foundation in the fungi, primarily through an environmental lens. Undergraduate and graduate students will learn the basics of fungi in three core sections: 1) Phylogeny, taxonomy, and diagnostics (Who are the fungi?); 2) Morphology and physiology (How do fungi work?); 3) Ecology and Biotechnology (What are fungal implications and applications?). Within each core section, there will be one class period devoted to a discussion of the environment, the role of fungi, and the human dimensions of conservation and management. This discussion will be used by the class to vote for an environmental theme used to frame writing assignments, one per unit. Using this theme, all students will create a "Fungus in Focus" one-page "brief" focused on this environmental issue. This is a creative way to connect "dots" for students linking microbial processes to environment, in our case harnessing connections to fungi that often have visible characters (e.g. mushrooms) that make those connections easier for students. We will also go on two field trips, one to a mushroom cultivation facility, and one into the field in April, all depending on class size and weather.prereq: Introductory Biology course

PMB4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4111/PMB 5111
Typically offered: Every Fall

Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns.prereq: MicB 3301 required; BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 recommended

PMB5212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3212/PMB 5212
Typically offered: Every Spring

No matter how you classify life on Earth, the fungi are in a Kingdom of their own. Latest estimates of the number of fungal species on our planet are between 2.2 and 3.8 million species. The diversity of single-celled and multi-cellular fungi is staggering, the result of divergence within a group of aquatic eukaryotes one billion years ago (± 500 million years). That divergence ultimately gave rise to animals and fungi, but the diversification within the fungal lineages is unrivaled. They can be found in aerobic and anaerobic environments. They are found on every Continent, recycling and reallocating vast amounts of nutrients in every Biome. They cause problems in crops but are also used to make food, with ancient processes such as fermentation and mushroom cultivation. For these reasons, mycology (study of fungi) is increasingly popular among students with interests as diverse as their fungal subjects. With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing to sample entire communities, we are seeing fungi in all of these places where they were previously invisible. The fungal role in Earth's most critical processes is, right now, coming into light. It is an exciting time to study Kingdom Fungi.This course uses a format of lecture, discussion, and field trips to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a solid foundation in the fungi, primarily through an environmental lens. Undergraduate and graduate students will learn the basics of fungi in three core sections: 1) Phylogeny, taxonomy, and diagnostics (Who are the fungi?); 2) Morphology and physiology (How do fungi work?); 3) Ecology and Biotechnology (What are fungal implications and applications?). Within each core section, there will be one class period devoted to a discussion of the environment, the role of fungi, and the human dimensions of conservation and management. This discussion will be used by the class to vote for an environmental theme used to frame writing assignments, one per unit. Using this theme, all students will create a Fungus in Focus one-page brief focused on this environmental issue. This is a creative way to connect dots for students linking microbial processes to the environment, in our case harnessing connections to fungi that often have visible characters (e.g. mushrooms) that make those connections easier for students. We will also go on two field trips, one to a mushroom cultivation facility, and one into the field in April, all depending on class size and weather.

PMB3002 - Plant Biology: Function

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course explores a range of plant physiological processes, including how plants make and use food; acquire and use minerals; transport water and nutrients; and regulate growth and development in response to hormones and environmental cues, such as light quality.While this course is paired with the PMB 3005W Plant Function Laboratory, the courses do not need to be taken together or in a specific order.prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]

PMB3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

In this lab course, students will use a variety of biological techniques to study plant structure and anatomy, plant physiology, cell biology, and plant growth. This includes topics related to climate change, plant adaptation, crop domestication, and genetic engineering. Includes hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus.While this course is paired with the PMB3002 lecture course, the courses do not need to be taken together or in a specific order.Prereq: BIOL 1009, BIOL 2003, or equiv.

BIOC3022 - Biochemistry for Life Scientists

Credits: 3.0 [max 6.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course provides an introduction to biochemistry including discussion of the structure and functions of biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids), central metabolic pathways, and the mechanisms of enzyme action.This course is intended for students in the College of Biological Sciences. Students from other colleges should register for BIOC 3021.prereq: CHEM 2301 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equivalent

BIOC4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Advanced survey of structure/catalysis, metabolism/bioenergetics.prereq: (BIOL 1009 or 2003 or equiv) AND (Chem 2302 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equiv)

BIOL4003 - Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4003/GCD 3022
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Genetic information, its transmission from parents to offspring, its expression in cells/organisms, and its course in populations.prereq: Biol 2003/2003H or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or grad

PMB4131 - Prokaryotic Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4131/PMB 5131
Typically offered: Every Spring

Genetics is the application of abstractions to understand biological function. Much of our understanding at the molecular level of the natural world is derived from genetic work in model microbial systems like Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Saccharomyces. Prokaryotic Genetics will focus on a molecular understanding of bacteria, with a smattering of archaea and phage genetics, covering both classic (transposons, mutant/suppressors) and modern (sequencing, metagenomics, synthetic biology) genetic approaches.

BIOC4332 - Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Advanced survey of molecular biology. Mechanisms of gene action/biological regulation.prereq: BioC 4331 or Bioc 3201 or BioC 3022

BIOL4004 - Cell Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells.prereq: Completion of Biol 4003 is preferred, Biol2003/2003H or Biol4003 or grad

MICB4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4141W/4171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Structure, attachment, entry. Genome replication/mRNA production by RNA viruses. Reverse transcription. DNA virus templates. Replication of DNA virus genomes. Processing of viral pre-mRNA. Translational control. Assembly, host defense, tumor viruses, pathogenesis, HIV, antivirals.prereq: Biol 2003 and Biol 4003 and [MicB 4131 or instructor permission]

PMB4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4516W/ PMB 5516
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

In this course, we will cover current important research topics in plant cell biology. We will cover many plant-specific topics such as gravitropism, plant cell wall biosynthesis, structure and function, plasmodesmatal connections, signal transduction, tip growth, plant cytokinesis, cell energetics. We will also cover some topics that are important for both plant, fungal, and animal cell biology such as cell polarity, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, and the secretory system. Since we will be using recent literature as the course text, some important and classic cell biology topics will not be covered. In the field of cell biology, new discoveries are often the result of improvements in technology especially in imaging, so we will cover some recent advances in methodology. This is also a writing class with the goal of helping students become familiar and comfortable with writing in a scientific style. There will be writing instruction and there will be some reading assignments on scientific writing. There are no enforced prerequisites. Introductory courses on plants, genetics, and biochemistry are helpful.

BIOC4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry (WI)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Theory, principles, and use of fundamental techniques in modern biochemistry labs.prereq: 3021, 3022, or 4331 or equiv

BIOC4125 - Laboratory in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4125/BioC 4185/Biol 4125/
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer

This molecular biology laboratory course is designed to give students hands-on experience performing common techniques used in modern molecular biology, as well as the background information needed to understand what kind of information can be obtained by using them. Because of the dual nature of this course, a portion of the laboratory time will be spent on lectures explaining the theory behind the techniques being used as well as practical aspects of experimental design. In addition, readings will be assigned that explain the history and principles behind some of the techniques used. Basic recombinant DNA techniques: methods for growing, isolating, and purifying recombinant DNA and cloning vectors, DNA sequencing and sequence analysis, gene expression, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), other current techniques.prereq: Biol 3015 or Biol 3020 or Biol 3025 or Bioc 3021 or Bioc 3022 or Bioc 4331 or Biol 4003 or instructor consent

BIOC4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOC4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

CFAN3502 - Bahamas--Tropical Marine Biology and Shark Ecology

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer

Ecology of sharks and natural history of South Bimini Island. Marine ecosystems. Local flora and fauna. Local culture and development policy on the ecosystems.prereq: instr consent

CFAN3529 - From Rainforest to Reef: Wildlife Medicine and Conservation in Belize (GP, ENV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Introduction to key topics in wildlife medicine. Students will learn medical issues and approaches, the role of the veterinarian in wildlife conservation, zoo medicine, and wildlife rescue & rehabilitation. This program is held at the Belize Wildlife & Referral Clinicâ¿¿s (BWRC) teaching facility with BWRCâ¿¿s founder and wildlife veterinarian, Dr. Isabelle Paquet-Durand. Labs include distance immobilization, suture, spay & neuter, necropsy, comparative anatomy, radiography, parasitology and blood analysis. Field visits are conducted with Dr. Isabelle to the Belize Zoo and to avian, reptile, primate, and manatee centers. Students are introduced to preventative medicine and common diseases for many of these species. A spay & neuter lab reviews theory and suture practice, this is followed by a spay & neuter clinic organized in the field or at BWRC. Students also have the opportunity to observe, and when possible, assist the BWRC veterinary staff during their daily operations.

COP4794W - Writing Intensive Directed Research (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.

COP4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB3407 - Ecology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer

Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity and global dynamics of the earth.

EEB3408W - Ecology (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring

Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R).prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]

EEB3411 - Introduction to Animal Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Typically offered: Every Fall

This course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: ?Why is that animal doing that?? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. The lecture parallels a required laboratory.prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

EEB 3412W is a lecture/lab writing-intensive course. Why do animals behave the way they do? This question is relevant to conservation, agriculture, human health, veterinary medicine, developing artificial intelligence, and understanding the origins of human behavior. This writing intensive course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: Why is that animal doing that? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. Throughout the course, students will be immersed in the scientific process, reading scientific literature, thinking critically, formulating their own research questions and answering them in an independent project.This is a writing intensive course that covers scientific process and how to formulate research questions.prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB3807 - Ecology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

Population growth/interactions. Ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of human populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity. Lab, field work.prereq: [One semester college biology], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or MATH 1281 or equiv]

EEB3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a fieldstation, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study ofanimal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicateto one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both ofthese. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independentresearch project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade.This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period inMay/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB4129 - Mammalogy

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Evolutionary and biogeographic history of mammalia. Recognize, identify, and study natural history of mammals at the ordinal level, North American mammals at familial level, and mammals north of Mexico at generic level. Minnesota mammals at specific level. Includes lab.prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012

EEB4134 - Introduction to Ornithology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Structure, evolution, classification, distribution, migration, ecology, habitats, identification of birds. Lecture, lab, weekly field walks. One weekend field trip.prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012

EEB4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB4839 - Field Studies in Mammalogy

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

Techniques for studying small mammals. Lectures/field projects emphasize identification, distributions, community interactions, ecophysiology, population ecology.prereq: College-level biology course that includes study of animals or instr consent

EEB4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB5407 - Ecology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Principles of ecology from populations to ecosystems. Applications to human populations, disease, exotic organisms, habitat fragmentation, biodiversity, and global dynamics of the earth.

EEB5409 - Evolution

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab.prereq: One semester college biology

FW4136 - Ichthyology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Fish biology, adaptations to different environments and modes of living, and environmental relationships. Lab emphasizes anatomy and identification of Minnesota fishes.prereq: Biol 1001 or Biol 2012

GCD3485 - Bioinformatic Analysis: Introduction to the Computational Characterization of Genes and Proteins

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Bioinformatic analysis is the exploration of molecular sequence, structure, and function using online tools and databases. In this class, we'll learn to use some of the most powerful tools available for biologists to investigate the nature of genes and proteins. We will each explore a gene and the protein it encodes that no one before us has studied. We will learn to analyze and interpret the diverse forms of bioinformatic data we obtain, and we will consider how the data we find allows us to generate and evaluate original hypotheses that can be tested in the laboratory. This is a hands-on course. While the class has no exams, it does require the completion of four problem sets and a summative final project over the course of the semester. It also involves doing some peer review of classmates? work. prereq: introductory course in genetics and cell biology such as Foundations

GCD4025 - Cell Biology, Development & Regeneration Laboratory

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course is designed for juniors and seniors to learn experimental approaches and techniques to study cellular processes and stem cell biology during animal development and tissue regeneration. Students will be exposed to theadvantages of different model systems that include cultured cells, chick, C. elegans and zebrafish. Students will learn to manipulate the cytoskeleton, perform cell differentiation, RNAi and regeneration assays, and to image both fixed tissue and live animal samples with conventional light microscopes as well as cutting edge technology, including super-resolution and multi-photon microscopes.prereq: BIOL 2003/2003H or instructor permission, Recommended prerequisite: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W (priority enrollment to GCD majors)

GCD4111 - Histology: Cell and Tissue Organization

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Structure/function of vertebrate tissues/organs. Electron microscopy, light microscopy, physiology, cell biology of higher animals. Light microscopy of mammalian tissues.prereq: GCD 3033 or BIOL 4004 or instructor consent

GCD4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

GCD4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

GCD5005 - Computer Programming for Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Computer programming skills with applications in biology. Design/build new computer programs for applications in cell/developmental biology, including modeling of biological processes, advanced data analysis, automated image analysis.prereq: BIOL 4003 or BIOL 4004 or GCD 3033 or CBS grad or BMBB or MCDB&G grad student, general statistics course

MICB3301 - Biology of Microorganisms

Credits: 5.0 [max 5.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to bacterial function/disease. Includes lab.prereq: [Biol 1961 and Biol 2003] or Biol 1009 or instructor permission

MICB4215 - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Physiology and Diversity

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Isolation/cultivation of wide variety of bacteria. Physiological experiments illustrate characteristic features of microorganisms.prereq: MICB 3301 AND Microbiology major or minor; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors

MICB4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 4015/Micb 4225
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Yeast is used as a model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles and methods such as ultraviolet mutagenesis, isolation and creation of mutant strains, plasmid design and construction, PCR, Sanger sequencing, gene replacement, and bioinformatics. Students will design and execute their own independent research project using hands-on experimentation with advanced molecular methodsprereq: MicB 3301 and [Biol 4003 or permission]; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors

MICB4235 - Advanced Laboratory: Virology, Immunology, and Microbial Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Techniques, experimental methods in microbial genetics, immunology. Virology used to study microbes/interactions with host.prereq: Micb 3301 and [Bioc 3022 or Bioc 4331] and [MicB 4171 prereq or concurrent registration or permission]

MICB4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 15.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

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MICB4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 28.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

NSC5551 - Itasca Cell and Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

Intensive lab introduction to cellular and molecular aspects of research techniques in contemporary neurobiology; held at Itasca Biological Station. Electrophysiological investigations of neuronal properties, neuropharmacological assays of transmitter action, and immunohistochemical studies in experimental preparations.prereq: Neuroscience grad or instr consent

NSC5561 - Systems Neuroscience

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Principles of organization of neural systems forming the basis for sensation/movement. Sensory-motor/neural-endocrine integration. Relationships between structure and function in nervous system. Team taught. Lecture, laboratory.prereq: NSc grad student or instr consent

NSCI4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research. Writing intensive.prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements

NSCI4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research.prereq: instr consent, dept consent; max of 7 cr of 4993 and/or 4994 may count toward major requirements

PMB3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

In this lab course, students will use a variety of biological techniques to study plant structure and anatomy, plant physiology, cell biology, and plant growth. This includes topics related to climate change, plant adaptation, crop domestication, and genetic engineering. Includes hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus.While this course is paired with the PMB3002 lecture course, the courses do not need to be taken together or in a specific order.Prereq: BIOL 1009, BIOL 2003, or equiv.

PMB3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus.prereq: One semester college biology

PMB4321 - Minnesota Flora

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Fall Even Year

Practical skills for identifying plant species/surveying Minnesota vegetation to students of biology, environmental sciences, resource management, horticulture. Integrates botany, ecology, evolution, earth history, climate, global change in context of local plant communities. Labs/Saturday field trips explore Minnesota plants/plant communities.prereq: One semester college biology

PMB4511 - Flowering Plant Diversity

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Systematics of flowering plants of the world. Ecology, geography, origins, and evolution. Family characteristics. Floral structure, function, evolution. Pollination biology. Methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Molecular evolution. Taxonomic terms. Methods of collection/identification. Lab.prereq: BIOL 1001 or 1009 or 1009H or 2002

PMB4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

PMB4994 - Directed Research

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory, or field investigation course. The research topic needs to be agreed on by both the student and the faculty mentor and explained in a research/directed studies contract. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL3012 - Animal Diversity and Evolution

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3012
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course is a survey of animal diversity, with an emphasis on understanding the major animal groups, how they are related to one another, how they differ in structure, and how each group achieves survival and reproduction in the diverse environments of the Earth. We will place particular emphasis on major evolutionary transitions that animals have made through their history, including the origins of multicellularity, the achievement of motion, invasion of terrestrial habitats, and the achievement of flight. We will also emphasize the science behind our contemporary understanding of animals, from multiple perspectives ? behavioral, evolutionary, physiological, and ecological. Lab requires dissection, including mammals.prereq: BIOL 1001/1001H, or BIOL 1009/1009H, or BIOL 1951/1951H

EEB5534 - Biodiversity Sci: The origins, maintenance, consequences, detection and assessment of biodiversity (ENV)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3534/EEB 5534
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Biodiversity science is a rapidly expanding field of enquiry with increasing digital resources and global monitoring capabilities precisely at the moment in history that scientists recognize as the Sixth Extinction. In other words, we are currently facing a biodiversity crisis with threats to the Earth's biota not seen since the dinosaurs perished 65 million years ago. "Biodiversity" was coined by W.G. Rosen and E.O Wilson in the 1980s to describe the variation in all of life on Earth. The term is now widely used in both the scientific and popular literature and is at the center of scientific enquiry, conservation efforts, large-scale collaborative pursuits of technological advances to allow monitoring from space, and global assessments that interface with international policy. Biodiversity requires integration across multiple disciplines from evolution, to ecology, remote sensing, conservation biology, economics and the social sciences, including the environmental policy. Biodiversity science is thus inherently interdisciplinary. As a consequence, rarely does a single course provide students the opportunity to focus on this critical topic from multiple perspectives and dimensions. This new course seeks to provide students intensive study of biodiversity from six perspectives: 1) the origins of biodiversity, including the processes of speciation and extinction over macroevolutionary timescales and those involved in generating biological variation at microevolutionary scales; 2) the ecological problem of species coexistence, given the nature of competitive interactions and biological filters with a focus on the interactions of individual species and major threats to biodiversity; 3) the consequences of biodiversity and biodiversity loss for ecosystem functions, focusing on ecosystem scale processes; 4) the services or benefits to humans attributed to biodiversity, including cultural benefits of biodiversity; here we discuss both practical and ethical arguments for sustaining biodiversity; 5) methods of detecting biodiversity including classic field biodiversity observations and taxonomic collections and emerging remote sensing methods that harness hyperspectral data and satellite imagery; and 6) scientific assessments of biodiversity that communicate the science of biodiversity to policymakers, particularly the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The IPBES involves scientists from around the world and integrates indigenous and local knowledge (ILK). The United Nations and governments around the globe are sponsoring the IPBES, building on earlier assessments such as a prominent one in the UK. Several guest lecturers from across the University will participate in discussions and aid in development of computer labs (including Sharon Jansa (CBS), Keith Barker (CBS), Joe Knight (CFANS), and others).

BIOL3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/AnSc 3303W/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format.prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]

BIOL2005 - Animal Diversity Laboratory

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2005/Biol 2012/Biol 3012
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Dissection, direct observation of representatives of major animal groups.

EEB3409 - Evolution

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3409/Biol 3809/Biol 5409/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab.prereq: One semester college biology

EEB5409 - Evolution

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Diversity of forms in fossil record and in presently existing biology. Genetic mechanisms of evolution, including natural selection, sexual selection, genetic drift. Examples of ongoing evolution in wild/domesticated populations and in disease-causing organisms. Lab.prereq: One semester college biology

PMB3802 - Field Microbiology at Itasca Biological Research Station

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3802/PMB 5802
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer

The microbial world is incredibly diverse: there are estimated to be more microbial cells on Earth than stars in the entire universe. Much of our understanding in microbiology derives from studies of pure cultures; organisms that can easily be grown in the lab. However, it is now clear that the vast majority of microorganisms in nearly every environment are notreadily grown under laboratory conditions. We must therefore go to them. Field Microbiology will be a three-week intensive course where students will be taught methods of environmental microbiology in both lecture and laboratory format. The goal is to not only quantify who is in a given sample, but also to understand something about the conditionsthey live in (temperature, nutrient availability, etc.). Ecological data and microbial community structure will be generated using Oxford Nanopore sequencing technology ? a cutting edge method to generate large sequencing datasets in real-time. Analyses will be integrated with an in situ set of field instrumentation that includes an eddy covariance system for quantifying fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from Lake Itasca and Elk Lake, as well as in-lake measurements of solar radiation, dissolved organic matter, pH, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll. A series of field trips will be scheduled to locations in and around Itasca State Park including Elk Lake, Arco Lake, Iron Springs Bog and Lake Alice Spring. Students will also develop an independent research project that will apply methods learned during the first 1.5 weeks of the course.

PMB5802 - Field Microbiology at Itasca Biological Research Station

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3802/PMB 5802
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer

The microbial world is incredibly diverse: there are estimated to be more microbial cells on Earth than stars in the entire universe. Much of our understanding in microbiology derives from studies of pure cultures; organisms that can easily be grown in the lab. However, it is now clear that the vast majority of microorganisms in nearly every environment are not readily grown under laboratory conditions. We must, therefore, go to them. Field Microbiology will be a three-week intensive course where students will be taught methods of environmental microbiology in both lecture and laboratory format. The goal is to not only quantify who is in a given sample but also to understand something about the conditions they live in (temperature, nutrient availability, etc.). Ecological data and microbial community structure will be generated using Oxford Nanopore sequencing technology - a cutting edge method to generate large sequencing datasets in real-time. Analyses will be integrated with an in situ set of field instrumentation that includes an eddy covariance system for quantifying fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from Lake Itasca and Elk Lake, as well as in-lake measurements of solar radiation, dissolved organic matter, pH, conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll. A series of field trips will be scheduled to locations in and around Itasca State Park including Elk Lake, Arco Lake, Iron Springs Bog and Lake Alice Spring. Students will also develop an independent research project that will apply methods learned during the first 1.5 weeks of the course.

PMB3812 - Field Mycology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3812/PMB 5812
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Summer

This class focuses on learning about how to study fungi. Students will gain experience identifying mushrooms and other samples collected during course field trips using macromorphological, microscopic, and molecular techniques. In addition, students will isolate fungi from environmental samples and maintain cultures as well as assess fungal community abundance and composition using both traditional (e.g., root tip colonization) and DNA-based methods (e.g., next-generation sequencing, bioinformatics, and ecological statistics). Course lectures highlight different aspects of fungal diversity (taxonomic, physiological, and ecological) and lab exercises provide hands-on practice. Course writing assignments and presentations emphasize exploring the natural history of fungi as well as critically assessing primary research literature. Permission is required for undergraduates to enroll in the graduate level of this course (PMB 5812); inquire with the instructor.

PMB5812 - Field Mycology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3812/PMB 5812
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring & Summer

This class focuses on learning about how to study fungi. Students will gain experience identifying mushrooms and other samples collected during course field trips using macromorphological, microscopic, and molecular techniques. In addition, students will isolate fungi from environmental samples and maintain cultures as well as assess fungal community abundance and composition using both traditional (e.g., root tip colonization) and DNA-based methods (e.g., next-generation sequencing, bioinformatics, and ecological statistics). Course lectures highlight different aspects of fungal diversity (taxonomic, physiological, and ecological) and lab exercises provide hands-on practice. Course writing assignments and presentations emphasize exploring the natural history of fungi as well as critically assessing primary research literature.Permission is required for undergraduates to enroll in the graduate-level of this course (PMB 5812); inquire with the instructor.

BIOC4225 - Laboratory in NMR Techniques

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Summer

Practical aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Hands-on experience with 500/600 MHz instruments. Sample preparation/handling, contamination sources, tube/probe options, experiment selection, experimental procedures, software, data processing.prereq: 4331; 4521 recommended; intended for biochemistry majors

BIOC4325 - Laboratory in Mass Spectrometry

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Hands-on experience with techniques/instruments. Sample preparation/handling, 2-dimenstioal gels, MS-MS, MALDI-TOF, electrospray/LC-MS, experiment selection/procedures, software, data processing.prereq: 4332, 4521

BIOC4331 - Biochemistry I: Structure, Catalysis, and Metabolism in Biological Systems

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 3021/BioC 3022/BioC 4331/
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Advanced survey of structure/catalysis, metabolism/bioenergetics.prereq: (BIOL 1009 or 2003 or equiv) AND (Chem 2302 or CHEM 2081/2085 or equiv)

BIOC4332 - Biochemistry II: Molecular Mechanisms of Signal Transduction and Gene Expression

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Advanced survey of molecular biology. Mechanisms of gene action/biological regulation.prereq: BioC 4331 or Bioc 3201 or BioC 3022

BIOC4351 - Protein Engineering

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Key properties of enzymes/molecular basis, computer modeling strategies, mutagenesis strategies to create protein variants, expression/screening of protein variants. Evaluate research papers, identify unsolved practical/theoretical problems, plan protein engineering experiment.prereq: 4331 or instr consent

BIOC4521 - Introduction to Physical Biochemistry

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Physical chemical principles, their applications in biochemistry. Thermodynamics, kinetics, spectroscopy, solution dynamics as applied to biochemical reactions/ biopolymers.prereq: 4331 recommended, (Chem 1081 or 1061 and 1065) AND (Physics 1221 or 1201W or 1301W) required

BIOC4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOC4960 - Special Topics in Biochemistry

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

In-depth study of a topic in biochemistry.prereq: [[3021 or equiv], CHEM 2301]] or instr consent

BIOC4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOC5309 - Biocatalysis and Biodegradation

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Bioc 5309/MicE 5309
Typically offered: Every Spring

Fundamentals of microbial enzymes/metabolism as pertaining to biodegradation of environmental pollutants/biosynthesis for making commodity chemicals. Practical examples. Guest speakers from industry.

BIOC5352 - Biotechnology and Bioengineering for Biochemists

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5352/MicB 5352
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Protein biotechnology. Microorganisms used as hosts for protein expression, protein expression, and engineering methods. Production of enzymes of industrial interest. Applications of protein biotechnology in bioelectronics. Formulation of therapeutic biopharmaceuticals.Recommended prerequisites: Biochemistry (BiOC 3021 or 3022 or 4331) and Microbiology MICB 3301

BIOC5361 - Microbial Genomics and Bioinformatics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Introduction to genomics. Emphasizes microbial genomics. Sequencing methods, sequence analysis, genomics databases, genome mapping, prokaryotic horizontal gene transfer, genomics in biotechnology, intellectual property issues. Hands-on introduction to UNIX shell scripting, genomic data analysis using R and Excel in a computer lab setting. prereq: College-level courses in [organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology]

BIOC5528 - Spectroscopy and Kinetics

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Biochemical dynamics from perspectives of kinetics and spectroscopy. Influence of structure, molecular interactions, and chemical transformations on biochemical reactions. Focuses on computational, spectroscopic, and physical methods. Steady-state and transient kinetics. Optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopies.prereq: Intro physical chemistry or equiv; intro biochemistry recommended

BIOC5535 - Introduction to Modern Structural Biology -- Diffraction

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5535/BioC 5527
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Theory and practice in the determination of three-dimensional structures of macromolecules using x-ray and neutron diffraction and electron microscopy. prereq: (Introductory biochemistry, introductory physics, college calculus] or physical chemistry or instr consent

BIOC5536 - Introduction to Modern Structural Biology - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5527BioC 5536
Typically offered: Every Fall

Theory and practice in the determination of three-dimensional structures of macromolecules using NMR. Recommended prerequisite courses: (Introductory biochemistry, introductory physics, college calculus) or physical chemistry

BIOL3015 - Molecular Biology

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3015/Biol 3020/3025
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

All areas of biology have been transformed by the recent advances in molecular biologytechnology. Every life scientist, whether they study viruses or crashes of elephants, uses DNA cloning,sequencing, and genomic analysis. This technology has also impacted all aspects of health care bygenerating highly specific diagnostic tools and personalized treatments. The purpose of this course is to givestudents a solid foundation in the principles and tools of molecular biology.Biol 3015 will introduce concepts and techniques for understanding gene expression and the flow ofgenetic information. We will discuss the structure of nucleic acids and proteins, the replication and repair ofDNA, transcription and its regulation, and translation. Students will also learn about current technologiesused in molecular biology including cloning, PCR, DNA sequencing, mass spectrometry, DNA microarrays,proteomics, bioinformatics, and whole genome analysis.Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: BIOL 3025

BIOL3025 - Molecular Biology and Society (TS)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3015/Biol 3020/3025
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

An in-depth analysis of molecular biology topics and methods related to the Central Dogma of modern biology. This course is open to both CBS majors and non-CBS majors. Prerequisites include Biol2003/2003H or [Biol1009/1009H AND Chem1061/1061H].

BIOL3211 - Physiology of Humans and Other Animals

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3301/AnSc 3303W/Biol 3211
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Study of the various solutions to common physiological problems faced by humans, other vertebrates, and invertebrates. Core concepts in physiology including flow down gradients, homeostatsis, cell-cell communication, interdependence of body systems, cell membrane dynamics, and mathematical modeling of physiological processes. Active learning format.prereq: [1009 or 2003], [CHEM 1062/1066 or 1082/1086], [2005 is recommended]

BIOL3503 - Biology of Aging

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Age-related changes in individuals/populations. Evolution of senescence. Genes that influence aging. Interventions. Prospects for an aging human society.prereq: 1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv

BIOL3600 - Directed Instruction

Credits: 1.0 -2.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Students assist with biology colloquium.prereq: 1020, upper div, application, instr consent; up to 4 cr may apply to major

BIOL3700 - Undergraduate Seminar

Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 9.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Faculty members lead students in discussions on topics of interest.

BIOL4201 - Teaching in the Biology Laboratory

Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Pedagogical underpinnings for teaching in lab.prereq: Student who is teaching in CBS lab course

BIOL4590 - Coral Reef Ecology

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Contemporary issues in tropical reef ecology from diverse perspectives. Option of two-credit seminar during fall semester plus additional two-credit field option (BIOL 4596) to involve SCUBA diving/snorkeling on tropical reef.prereq: Introductory biology course with lab

BIOL4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL4950 - Special Topics in Biology

Credits: 1.0 -4.0 [max 12.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

In-depth study of special topic in life sciences.

BIOL4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL5309 - Molecular Ecology And Ecological Genomics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 5309/PBio 5309
Typically offered: Fall Even Year

Application of molecular tools (PCR, sequencing, AFLP, SNPs, QTL) and analyses of molecular data for understanding ecological/evolutionary processes. Strengths/weaknesses of techniques/analyses. Questions molecular tools are used to answer.prereq: BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3409 or BIOL 4003

CHEM4412 - Chemical Biology of Enzymes

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Enzyme classification with examples from current literature. Strategies to decipher enzyme mechanisms. Chemical approaches to control enzyme catalysis.prereq: [2302 or equiv], 4501

COP4793W - Writing Intensive Directed Studies (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

COP4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB3500 - Special Topics in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior

Credits: 1.0 -3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Special Topics in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior

EEB3603 - Science, Protection, and Management of Aquatic Environments

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Fundamentals of aquatic ecology. Case study approach to water problems faced by society (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, invasive species, acid rain, wetland protection, biodiversity preservation). Science used to diagnose/remediate or remove problems.prereq: One semester college biology

EEB3701 - EEB Seminar

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Learn about recent developments in cutting-edge topics in the area of Ecology, Education and Behavior and engage with the EEB community of faculty, graduate students and post docs and observe professional norms in the field. Engage directly with practicing scientists and the primary literature from their work and learn how to give a scientific talk by observing and critically evaluating and discussing seminars.

EEB4068 - Plant Physiological Ecology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4068/EEB 5068
Prerequisites: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or #
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in an ecological context. Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.

EEB4329 - Primate Ecology and Social Behavior

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 4329/EEB 4329
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Primates as model system to explore animal/human behavior. Factors influencing sociality/group composition. Mating systems. Prevalence of altruistic, cooperative, and aggressive behavior. Strength of social bonds in different species. Evolution of intelligence/culture.prereq: BIOL 1009 or BIOL 1951 or BIOL 3411 or ANTH 1001 or instr consent

EEB4330W - Animal Communication (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Mechanisms of signal production/perception, signal propagation. How signals can convey information. How signalers, signals, receivers are adapted for communication by natural/sexual selection.prereq: (BIOL 1951 or BIOL 1951H or Biol 1009) and (EEB 3412W or EEB 3411 or EEB 3811W)

EEB4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems.

EEB4611 - Biogeochemical Processes

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4611/EEB 5611
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Application of biochemistry, ecology, chemistry, and physics to environmental issues. Issues in biogeochemistry. Impact of humans on biogeochemical processes in soils, lakes, oceans, estuaries, forests, urban/managed ecosystems, and extreme environments (e.g., early Earth, deep sea vents, thermal springs).prereq: [BIOL 1009 or 2003] AND [CHEM 1081 or 1061 or 1071H] or instr consent

EEB4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB5042 - Quantitative Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Fundamentals of quantitative genetics. Genetic/environmental influences on expression of quantitative traits. Approaches to characterizing genetic basis of trait variation. Processes that lead to change in quantitative traits. Applied/evolutionary aspects of quantitative genetic variation.prereq: [BIOL 4003 or GCD 3022] or instr consent; a course in statistics isrecommended

EEB5053 - Ecology: Theory and Concepts

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Classical and modern mathematical theories of population growth, interspecific interactions, ecosystem dynamics and functioning, with emphasis on underlying assumptions and on effects of added biological reality on robustness of predictions, stability, interspecific interactions, ecosystem structure and functioning.prereq: Biol 3407 or instr consent

EEB5068 - Plant Physiological Ecology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 4068/EEB 5068
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Plant function, its plasticity/diversity in ecological context.Impact of environmental stresses on major physiological processes of plants, including photosynthesis, respiration, water uptake/transport, and nutrient uptake/assimilation. Lab, field trip to Cedar Creek.prereq: BIOL 2022 or BIOL 3002 or BIOL 3407 or BIOL 3408W or instr consent

EEB5609 - Ecosystem Ecology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems.

GCD3486 - Personal Genome Analysis

Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

In this course, students will analyze their personal genome data. They will gain experience using computer applications and online databases of human genetic information. They will learn about their ancestry, their regional origins, and their risks of genetically linked disease. They will learn how to put human genome results into context and how to explain human genomics in non-technical language. Prerequisite: BIOL 2003/2003H

GCD4034 - Molecular Genetics and Genomics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Molecular genetics and genomics of eukaryotes. Course emphasizes mechanisms of gene regulation and how these are studied. Current strategies used to study the activity and function of genes and genomes, including the role of chromatin, will be covered. Techniques will include gene knockouts/knockdown, genome engineering, genome-wide analysis of RNA and protein expression and function, as well as genome-wide protein binding and chromatin interaction mapping. Technologies covered will include next-generations and third-generation sequencing and CRISPR-based strategies for gene modification and precision gene regulation. Students will analyze and present recent primary papers in molecular genetic and genomics.Prerequisite: BIOL 4003

GCD4143 - Human Genetics and Genomics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Human Genetics ? the science of how our genomes function, vary, and shape our unique, individual characteristics ? is a rapidly expanding field with major implications for medical and fundamental research, clinical practice, and many other areas. In this course, students will learn about the principles of human genetics & genomics at the levels of molecules, cells, individuals, and populations.Topics include patterns of inheritance; the molecular causes and biochemical basis of genetic disorders; disease gene identification; the origin and distribution of human genetic variation; genetic influences on common, complex diseases; epigenetics and regulation of gene expression; genomic technologies for understanding human genomes; cancer genetics; behavioral genetics; human ancestry and evolution; applications such as genetic screening, genetic counseling, and gene therapy; and ethical questions raised by emerging abilities to edit the human genome, modify the human germline, and many more. prereq: BIOL 4003 or instructor consent

GCD4151 - Molecular Biology of Cancer

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Regulatory pathways involved in directing normal development of complex eukaryotic organisms, how disruptions of these pathways can lead to abnormal cell growth/cancer. Causes, detection, treatment, prevention of cancer.prereq: Biol 4003

GCD4161 - Developmental Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Developmental biology is the study of the process by which organisms grow and develop from embryo to adult. This field encompasses the biology of morphogenesis, differentiation, regeneration, metamorphosis, and the growth and differentiation of stem cells. Topics focus primarily on animal development to include fertilization, cell specification, body patterning, stem cells, neurogenesis, organogenesis, limb formation, regeneration, sex determination, and developmental timing, as well as environmental impacts on development. Students will learn about genetic models such as fruit flies, nematodes, fish, mice, and plants. Coverage will be extended to human development and disease as appropriate. prereq: BIOL 4003; also recommended prerequisite: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W

GCD4171 - Stem Cells in Biology and Medicine

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 8181/SCB 8181
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Contemporary stem cell biology with emphasis on mechanisms/applications. Embryonic, tissue-specific, and induced pluripotent stem cells and potential uses in human disease.prerequisites: BIOL 4003 Genetics; recommended prerequisite: BIOL 4004 Cell Biology or GCD 4005WThis course can be used as an elective for certain CBS majors, such as the GCD major. Check the Program Requirements for your major to determine if it can be used as an elective.

GCD4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

GCD4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

GCD5036 - Molecular Cell Biology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Analysis of dynamic cellular activities at the molecular level in cell biological fields that are experiencing new research advances not yet reflected in textbooks. Significant emphasis is placed on understanding the experimental basis of our current knowledge of cellular processes through analysis of scientific papers. Project and presentation-based assessments of learning outcomes.prereq: BIOL 4004 or GCD 4005W or grad

MATH5445 - Mathematical Analysis of Biological Networks

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Development/analysis of models for complex biological networks. Examples taken from signal transduction networks, metabolic networks, gene control networks, and ecological networks.prereq: Linear algebra, differential equations

MATH5447 - Theoretical Neuroscience

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Nonlinear dynamical system models of neurons and neuronal networks. Computation by excitatory/inhibitory networks. Neural oscillations, adaptation, bursting, synchrony. Memory systems.prereq: 2243 or 2373 or 2574

MICB3303 - Biology of Microorganisms (without laboratory)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 2032/MicB 3301/VBS 2032
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, infectious disease, immunology, ecology of microbes. Molecular structure in relation to function of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses.prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 or instructor permission

MICB4131 - Immunology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4131/VPM 4131
Typically offered: Every Fall

Molecular, genetic and cellular basis for innate and adaptive immuneresponses. The immune systems role in; transplantation, autoimmune disease,cancer immunotherapy, vaccinololgy, acquired and genetic immunodeficiencies.Prereq: Biol 2003 or Biol 1009 and [Junior or senior]

MICB4151 - Molecular and Genetic Bases for Microbial Diseases

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Genetic basis of microbial pathogenesis. Effect of gene transfer and regulation on evolution of microbial pathogens and capacity to colonize, induce disease. Biochemical and cellular interactions between bacteria and human hosts.prereq: MICB 3301 AND [BIOL4003 OR PMB4131 OR Molecular Biology (BIOL 3020 or BIOL 3025 or BIOL 3015)]

MICB4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora.prereq: Biol 4003

MICB4171 - Biology, Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Viruses

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: MicB 4141W/4171
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Structure, attachment, entry. Genome replication/mRNA production by RNA viruses. Reverse transcription. DNA virus templates. Replication of DNA virus genomes. Processing of viral pre-mRNA. Translational control. Assembly, host defense, tumor viruses, pathogenesis, HIV, antivirals.prereq: Biol 2003 and Biol 4003 and [MicB 4131 or instructor permission]

MICB4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

MICB4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 36.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

MICE5035 - Personal Microbiome Analysis

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Personal Microbiome Analysis, an introduction to the computational exploration and analysis of your inner microbial community, also known as your microbiome. In this course, you will have the opportunity to explore your own microbiome using visualization and analysis tools. Sequencing your own microbiome is encouraged but not required for the course.Introductory biology or genetics is recommended: BIOL 1009, GCD 3022 or BIOL 4003.

NSC5031W - Perception (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Periodic Fall

Cognitive, computational, and neuroscience perspectives on visual perception. Color vision, pattern vision, image formation in eye, object recognition, reading, impaired vision. Course is biennial: offered fall of odd years.prereq: Psy 3031 or Psy 3051 or instr consent

(Video) Minnesota State University and Community College Walkthrough

NSC5040 - Brain Networks: From Connectivity to Dynamics

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Brain networks. Application of emerging science of complex networks to studies of the brain. Network approaches that provide fundamental insights into the integrative nature of brain function and its relation to the brain structure. Organization of brain networks and dynamics at multiple spatial scales, ranging from the microscale of single neurons and synapses, to mesoscale of anatomical cell groupings and their projections, and to the macroscale of brain regions and pathways. Experimental studies, including electrophysiology, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, that allow mapping network elements and structural/functional connectivity between them at different temporal and spatial scales will be considered. Experimental/theoretical perspectives.

NSC5202 - Theoretical Neuroscience: Systems and Information Processing

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: NSc 5202/Phsl 5202
Typically offered: Every Spring

Concepts of computational/theoretical neuroscience. Distributed representations and information theory. Methods for single-cell modeling, including compartmental/integrate-and-fire models. Learning rules, including supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning models. Specific systems models from current theoretical neuroscience literature. Lecture/discussion. Readings from current scientific literature.prereq: [3101, 3102W] recommended

NSC5203 - Basic and Clinical Vision Science

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Basic and clinical vision science.prereq: instr consent

NSC5461 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Lectures by team of faculty, problem sets in important physiological concepts, discussion of original research papers.prereq: NSc grad student or instr consent

NSC5462 - Neuroscience Principles of Drug Abuse

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Course Equivalencies: Phcl 5462/Nsc 5462
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

Current research on drugs of abuse, their mechanisms of action, characteristics shared by various agents, and neural systems affected by them. Offered biennially, spring semester of even-numbered years.prereq: instr consent

NSC5540 - Survey of Biomedical Neuroscience

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

Current topics in biomedical neuroscience, accompanied by supporting, fundamental concepts. Intensive, one week course.prereq: instr consent, intended for members of biomedical community or students with advanced scientific backgrounds

NSC5661 - Behavioral Neuroscience

Credits: 3.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Neural coding/representation of movement parameters. Neural mechanisms underlying higher order processes such as memorization, memory scanning, and mental rotation. Emphasizes experimental psychological studies in human subjects, single cell recording experiments in subhuman primates, and artificial neural network modeling.prereq: Grad NSc major or grad NSc minor or instr consent

NSCI3001W - Neuroscience and Society (CIV, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Ethical implications. Readings, personal reflections, class discussions, debates, and formal writing. Development of logical arguments, writing skills, oral presentation skills, and teamwork. Students present/argue both their own personal views and those of others. What it is like to have altered mentation, i.e. a brain disease or disability. Readings/multimedia reports from primary neuroscience literature as well as philosophy, policy, and law literature and popular media.

NSCI3101 - Neurobiology I: Molecules, Cells, and Systems

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3101/NSci 3101/Phsl 3101
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This course discusses the basic principles of cellular and molecular neurobiology and nervous systems. The main topics include: Organization of simple networks, neural systems and behavior; how the brain develops and the physiology and communication of neurons and glia; the molecular and genetic basis of cell organization; ion channel structure and function; the molecular basis of synaptic receptors; transduction mechanisms and second messengers; intracellular regulation of calcium; neurotransmitter systems, including excitation and inhibition, neuromodulation, system regulation, and the cellular basis of learning, memory, and cognition. The course is intended for students majoring in neuroscience, but is open to all students with the required prerequisites.

NSCI3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

NSCI4101 - Development of the Nervous System: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Nsci 4100/Nsci 8211
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course will extend students? understanding of fundamental concepts of biology and neuroscience through study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie development of the nervous system. Neurodevelopment provides a context in which to study processes active in many biological functions and diseases. Students will learn about each of the major cellular processes involved in development of the nervous system such as cell division and cell migration, and will learn about the function of molecules and signaling pathways active in each process. Human developmental pathologies will be studied as a means to better understand normal developmental processes. Some lectures will focus on current research, and students will be expected to read some scientific literature.

NSCI4150 - Advanced Topics in Neuroscience

Credits: 3.0 [max 9.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

In-depth study of aspects of neurodevelopment, neurochemistry/molecular neuroscience, sensory systems, motor control, and behavioral neuroscience. Primarily for undergraduates majoring in neuroscience or related areas.

NSCI4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Individual study of selected topics. Emphasis on readings, use of scientific literature. Writing intensive.prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements

NSCI4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Individual study of selected topics with emphasis on selected readings and use of scientific literature.prereq: instr consent, dept consent; max of 7 cr of 4993 and/or 4994 may count toward major requirements

PHCL4001 - Mechanisms of Drug Action

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

How drugs function as applied to the treatment of a single medical condition. Pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics.prereq: Upper div or instr consent; [prev or concurrent] courses in [biology, biochemistry] recommended

PMB3002 - Plant Biology: Function

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course explores a range of plant physiological processes, including how plants make and use food; acquire and use minerals; transport water and nutrients; and regulate growth and development in response to hormones and environmental cues, such as light quality.While this course is paired with the PMB 3005W Plant Function Laboratory, the courses do not need to be taken together or in a specific order.prereq: [1002 or 1009 or 2003 or equiv], [CHEM 1011 or one semester chemistry with some organic content]

PMB3701 - PMB Seminar

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Develop professional oral communication skills through the attendance and evaluation of biological science public seminars, the construction and presentation of a professional public seminar, and the introduction of a student seminar speaker. prereq: BIOL 3004/3004H.

PMB4111 - Microbial Physiology and Diversity

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4111/PMB 5111
Typically offered: Every Fall

Structural/functional organization of bacteria/archaea. Energy metabolism utilizing light, inorganic/organic chemicals. Cell morphologies, roles/assembly of surface structures. Growth/survival mechanisms in various extreme environments. Adaptation to changing conditions by development of specialized cells/structures, altering metabolic patterns.prereq: MicB 3301 required; BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 recommended

PMB4121 - Microbial Ecology and Applied Microbiology

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Evolution/structure of microbial communities. Population interaction within ecosystems. Quantitative/habitat ecology. Biogeochemical cycling. Molecular microbial ecology, gene transfer in the environment. Molecular phylogeny of microorganisms. Application of microbes in agriculture. Production of commodity chemicals, drugs, and other high-value products.prereq: 3301

PMB4131 - Prokaryotic Genetics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4131/PMB 5131
Typically offered: Every Spring

Genetics is the application of abstractions to understand biological function. Much of our understanding at the molecular level of the natural world is derived from genetic work in model microbial systems like Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Saccharomyces. Prokaryotic Genetics will focus on a molecular understanding of bacteria, with a smattering of archaea and phage genetics, covering both classic (transposons, mutant/suppressors) and modern (sequencing, metagenomics, synthetic biology) genetic approaches.

PMB4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4516W/ PMB 5516
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

In this course, we will cover current important research topics in plant cell biology. We will cover many plant-specific topics such as gravitropism, plant cell wall biosynthesis, structure and function, plasmodesmatal connections, signal transduction, tip growth, plant cytokinesis, cell energetics. We will also cover some topics that are important for both plant, fungal, and animal cell biology such as cell polarity, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, and the secretory system. Since we will be using recent literature as the course text, some important and classic cell biology topics will not be covered. In the field of cell biology, new discoveries are often the result of improvements in technology especially in imaging, so we will cover some recent advances in methodology. This is also a writing class with the goal of helping students become familiar and comfortable with writing in a scientific style. There will be writing instruction and there will be some reading assignments on scientific writing. There are no enforced prerequisites. Introductory courses on plants, genetics, and biochemistry are helpful.

PMB4601 - Topics in Plant Biochemistry

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Biochemical analysis of processes unique to photosynthetic organisms. Photosynthesis and carbon dioxide fixation. Synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, and derivatives. Aromatic compounds such as lignin, other natural products. Functions of natural products.prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003], CHEM 2301

PMB4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a research/directed studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

PMB4993 - Directed Studies

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. The topic for the course needs to be explained in a research/directed studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, methodology to be used, and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

PMB5601 - Topics in Plant Biochemistry

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Biochemical analysis of processes unique to photosynthetic organisms. Photosynthesis and carbon dioxide fixation. Synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, and derivatives. Aromatic compounds such as lignin, other natural products. Functions of natural products.prereq: [BIOL 1002 or BIOL 1009 or BIOL 2003], CHEM 2301

EEB3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Methods/theories to understand humans in evolutionary framework. What can be known only/primarily from evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/coevolve in humans.

ANTH3002 - Sex, Evolution, and Behavior: Examining Human Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Anth 3002/EEB 3002
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

Methods/theories used to understand humans in an evolutionary framework. What can be known only, or primarily, form an evolutionary perspective. How evolutionary biology of humans might lead to better evolutionary theory. How physiology, development, behavior, and ecology coordinate/co-evolve in humans.

BIOC5444 - Muscle

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5444/ Phsl 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring

Muscle molecular structure/function and disease. Muscle regulation, ion transport, and force generation. Muscular dystrophy and heart disease.prereq: 3021 or BIOL 3021 or 4331 or BIOL 4331 or PHSL 3061 or instr consent

PHSL5444 - Muscle

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 5444/ Phsl 5444
Typically offered: Every Spring

Muscle membranes: structures, mechanisms, and physiological roles of channels/pumps. Muscle contraction: force generation by actin/myosin.prereq: 3061 or 3071 or 5061 or BioC 3021 or BioC 4331 or instr consent

PMB4412 - Plant Physiology and Development

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4412/PMB 5412
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Plant physiology and development is the study of how plant cells, tissues, and whole organisms grow and function in response to internal and external cues. PMB 4412/5412 covers the classic plant physiology and development processes including plant water relations, mineral nutrition, membrane transport, photosynthesis, respiration, vascular function, metabolism, growth and development, and hormone responses. The physics underlying our understanding of these physiological systems will also be addressed. Other areas of plant science such as plant genetics and biochemistry are covered in other courses and will not be emphasized this course.There are no enforced prerequisites for this course. The following preparation is recommended: PMB 2022 General Botany or PMB 3007W Plant Algal and Fungal Diversity; General Chemistry and Introductory Physics.

PMB5412 - Plant Physiology and Development

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4412/PMB 5412
Typically offered: Every Fall

Plant physiology and development is the study of how plant cells, tissues and whole organisms grow and function in response to internal and external cues. PMB 4412/5412 covers the classic plant physiology and development processes including plant water relations, mineral nutrition, membrane transport, photosynthesis, respiration, vascular function, metabolism, growth and development, and hormone responses. The physics underlying our understanding of these physiological systems will also be addressed. Other areas of plant science such as plant genetics and biochemistry are covered in other courses and will not be emphasized this course.There are no enforced prerequisites for this course. The following preparation is recommended: PMB 2022 General Botany or PMB 3007W Plant Algal and Fungal Diversity; General Chemistry and Introductory Physics.

PMB3212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3212/PMB 5212
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

No matter how you classify life on Earth, the fungi are in a Kingdom of their own. Latest estimates of the number of fungal species on our planet are between 2.2 and 3.8 million species. The diversity of single-celled and multi-cellular fungi is staggering, the result of divergence within a group of aquatic eukaryotes one billion years ago (± 500 million years). That divergence ultimately gave rise to animals and fungi, but the diversification within the fungal lineages is unrivaled. They can be found in aerobic and anaerobic environments. They are found on every Continent, recycling and reallocating vast amounts of nutrients in every Biome. They cause problems in crops but are also used to make food, with ancient processes such as fermentation and mushroom cultivation. For these reasons, mycology (study of fungi) is increasingly popular among students with interests as diverse as their fungal subjects. With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing to sample entire communities, we are seeing fungi in all of these places where they were previously invisible. The fungal role in Earth's most critical processes is, right now, coming into light. It is an exciting time to study Kingdom Fungi.This course uses a format of lecture, discussion, and field trips to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a solid foundation in the fungi, primarily through an environmental lens. Undergraduate and graduate students will learn the basics of fungi in three core sections: 1) Phylogeny, taxonomy, and diagnostics (Who are the fungi?); 2) Morphology and physiology (How do fungi work?); 3) Ecology and Biotechnology (What are fungal implications and applications?). Within each core section, there will be one class period devoted to a discussion of the environment, the role of fungi, and the human dimensions of conservation and management. This discussion will be used by the class to vote for an environmental theme used to frame writing assignments, one per unit. Using this theme, all students will create a "Fungus in Focus" one-page "brief" focused on this environmental issue. This is a creative way to connect "dots" for students linking microbial processes to environment, in our case harnessing connections to fungi that often have visible characters (e.g. mushrooms) that make those connections easier for students. We will also go on two field trips, one to a mushroom cultivation facility, and one into the field in April, all depending on class size and weather.prereq: Introductory Biology course

PMB5212 - Fungi - A Kingdom of Their Own

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 3212/PMB 5212
Typically offered: Every Spring

No matter how you classify life on Earth, the fungi are in a Kingdom of their own. Latest estimates of the number of fungal species on our planet are between 2.2 and 3.8 million species. The diversity of single-celled and multi-cellular fungi is staggering, the result of divergence within a group of aquatic eukaryotes one billion years ago (± 500 million years). That divergence ultimately gave rise to animals and fungi, but the diversification within the fungal lineages is unrivaled. They can be found in aerobic and anaerobic environments. They are found on every Continent, recycling and reallocating vast amounts of nutrients in every Biome. They cause problems in crops but are also used to make food, with ancient processes such as fermentation and mushroom cultivation. For these reasons, mycology (study of fungi) is increasingly popular among students with interests as diverse as their fungal subjects. With the advent of high-throughput DNA sequencing to sample entire communities, we are seeing fungi in all of these places where they were previously invisible. The fungal role in Earth's most critical processes is, right now, coming into light. It is an exciting time to study Kingdom Fungi.This course uses a format of lecture, discussion, and field trips to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a solid foundation in the fungi, primarily through an environmental lens. Undergraduate and graduate students will learn the basics of fungi in three core sections: 1) Phylogeny, taxonomy, and diagnostics (Who are the fungi?); 2) Morphology and physiology (How do fungi work?); 3) Ecology and Biotechnology (What are fungal implications and applications?). Within each core section, there will be one class period devoted to a discussion of the environment, the role of fungi, and the human dimensions of conservation and management. This discussion will be used by the class to vote for an environmental theme used to frame writing assignments, one per unit. Using this theme, all students will create a Fungus in Focus one-page brief focused on this environmental issue. This is a creative way to connect dots for students linking microbial processes to the environment, in our case harnessing connections to fungi that often have visible characters (e.g. mushrooms) that make those connections easier for students. We will also go on two field trips, one to a mushroom cultivation facility, and one into the field in April, all depending on class size and weather.

BIOL3272H - Applied Biostatistics

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab.prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended.

BIOL3272 - Applied Biostatistics

Credits: 4.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3272Biol 3272H//Biol 5272
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Conceptual basis of statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of biological data. Data visualization, descriptive statistics, significance tests, experimental design, linear model, simple/multiple regression, general linear model. Lectures, computer lab.prereq: High school algebra; BIOL 2003 recommended

BIOL2996 - Directed Introduction to Research

Credits: 1.0 [max 2.0]
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Directed Introduction to Research is an introduction to laboratory or field biological research for students with no prior experience, normally first- and second-year students. The University directed studies contract will be used to describe the training experience which could include attending lab meetings, reading and discussing research papers from the lab, learning basic lab and field techniques, assays, and approaches used by the research group, and learning to keep a lab or field notebook. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course and how the assessment of learning will be conducted. Lab or field training can be led by graduate students or postdocs in the research group but one-on-one meetings with the PI should be included. The course is one credit and the student and PI agree that 45 hours of work will be done. There will be one group meeting per semester per major for all of the students enrolled in 2996 to discuss the research experience with the Director of Undergraduate Research for the major and a panel of more experienced undergraduate researchers. The goal of that meeting is community building and to introduce students to opportunities for further research experience. The grading option is S/N, similar to all directed studies/research courses in CBS. This course can be repeated, if it is done with a different mentor, for a total of two credits. One credit of this course can be counted as a degree requirement for each CBS major.

BIOL3610 - Internship: Professional Experience in Biological Sciences

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 6.0]
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Matches student's academic or career goals with opportunities in industry, non-profit organizations, and government agencies.Prereq-Acceptance into CBS Internship Program, internship workshop, college consent.

BIOL3905 - Beyond the Nobel Prize: Examining the Evolution of Swedish Innovation (GP)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course is open to undergraduates from all disciplines and will appeal to students with a broad interest creativity and innovation.Students will examine innovation across a variety of disciplines and consider how solutions to problems facing society require creativity, collaboration, and new ways of thinking. In particular, we will explore personal creativity, as well as how environments can foster innovation, particularly in the Swedish context by traveling to Stockholm over spring break. We examine the reasons behind Sweden?s ranking (#2 in 2017) on the Global Innovation Index, as well as the Nobel Prize, international awards bestowed by Swedish institutions that recognize significant academic, cultural and scientific advances. In addition, as a learning abroad seminar, students will learn about their own level of and strategies to increase their intercultural competence, and engage in a practical experience of navigating another culture in an intentional and reflective way.

BIOL4960H - Thesis Writing in the Biological Sciences: Developing the Literature Review

Credits: 1.0 [max 1.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

In the Fall semester of the two-semester capstone thesis support course, CBS honors students will develop and refine the literature review introduction component of the honors thesis. The course will focus on conceptualizing the gap in knowledge, drafting the literature review, and revising in response to peer and outside reader feedback. We will use the literature to unpack the conventions of authentic scientific writing so that students can begin to draft other sections of their thesis (methods, results narrative, publication ready figures, legends) By the end of the term, students will have developed and peer-workshopped at least one draft module of each data-related thesis section and they will have a revised version of the thesis introduction/literature review to deliver to their faculty research mentor for feedback before the start of the Spring term. Students should be in a research lab and have started their research project before the start of the semester. Students who have not yet fulfilled an upper division WI course in the biological sciences should wait until the Spring (final) semester to register for their major's version of WI directed research or WI directed studies (for example, MicB 4794W or 4793W). The completed and approved thesis will count for the WI.

NSCI3001W - Neuroscience and Society (CIV, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Ethical implications. Readings, personal reflections, class discussions, debates, and formal writing. Development of logical arguments, writing skills, oral presentation skills, and teamwork. Students present/argue both their own personal views and those of others. What it is like to have altered mentation, i.e. a brain disease or disability. Readings/multimedia reports from primary neuroscience literature as well as philosophy, policy, and law literature and popular media.

NSCI3505W - Mind and Brain (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course is intended as an introduction to the new views on the relationship between mind and brain. Over the last several decades, a new view of cognition and neural processing has been developed based on the concepts of al¬gorithm, representation, computation, and information processing. Within this theoretical frame¬work, psychological constructs are computational processes occur¬ring across physical neural systems. We will take a neuroscience and psychological perspective in which the physical neuroscience instantiates but does not diminish the psychological constructs. Although our conceptual framework will be computational, this course will not require or expect any mathematical or computer background. At the completion of this class, you will understand the implications of the physical nature of the brain ? how mentation is explicable from physical processes, and how decision-making arises from those same physical processes. Importantly, you will also understand the limitations of current knowledge and the methodologies being used to push those limitations. This class is not intended as a final step in this understanding, but as a first step into these issues. At the conclusion of the class, you should have sufficient understanding to continue more in-depth reading and study in these issues. There are no official prerequisites. However, I have found that students who have EITHER a strong computational background (computer science, mathematics, economics, physics) OR have taken an introductory neuroscience course (e.g. Nsci 2100) have done better in the class than students with no background. However, I have seen students come in with very little background and do well in the class if they engage with the class and work hard.

CHEM2311 - Organic Lab

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2311/Chem 2312H
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Laboratory techniques in synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds with an emphasis on green chemistry methodologies.prereq: Grade of at least C- in [2302] or [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2302

CHEM4001 - Chemistry of Biomass and Biomass Conversion to Fuels and Products (ENV)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: BBE 4001/BBE 5001/Chem 4001
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall

Chemical principles underlying structure, properties, processing, performance of plant materials.prereq: 2301, [jr or sr or instr consent]

CSCI3081W - Program Design and Development (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: CSci 3081W/CSci 4018W/CSci4089
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Principles of programming design/analysis. Concepts in software development. Uses a programming project to illustrate key ideas in program design/development, data structures, debugging, files, I/O, testing, and coding standards.prereq: [2021, 2041]; CS upper div, CS grad, or dept. permission

ESCI4102W - Vertebrate Paleontology: Evolutionary History and Fossil Records of Vertebrates (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Even Year

Vertebrate evolution (exclusive of mammals) in phylogenetic, temporal, functional, and paleoecological contexts. Vertebrate anatomy. Methods in reconstructing phylogenetic relationships and origin/history of major vertebrate groups, from Cambrian Explosion to modern diversity of vertebrate animals.prereq: 1001 or 1002 or Biol 1001 or Biol 1002 or Biol 1009 or instr consent

ESCI4103W - Fossil Record of Mammals (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Spring Odd Year

Evolutionary history of mammals and their extinct relatives. Methods in reconstructing phylogeny. Place of mammals in evolutionary history of vertebrate animals. Major morphological/ecological transitions. Origins of modern groups of mammals. Continuing controversies in studying fossil mammals.

MATH3283W - Sequences, Series, and Foundations: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Math 2283/3283W
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Introduction to reasoning used in advanced mathematics courses. Logic, mathematical induction, real number system, general/monotone/recursively defined sequences, convergence of infinite series/sequences, Taylor's series, power series with applications to differential equations, Newton's method. Writing-intensive component.prereq: [concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2243 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2263 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2373 or concurrent registration is required (or allowed) in 2374] w/grade of at least C-

STAT3011 - Introduction to Statistical Analysis (MATH)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: AnSc 3011/ESPM 3012/Stat 3011/
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Standard statistical reasoning. Simple statistical methods. Social/physical sciences. Mathematical reasoning behind facts in daily news. Basic computing environment.

STAT3021 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

This is an introductory course in statistics whose primary objectives are to teach students the theory of elementary probability theory and an introduction to the elements of statistical inference, including testing, estimation, and confidence statements.prereq: Math 1272

STAT3022 - Data Analysis

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Practical survey of applied statistical inference/computing covering widely used statistical tools. Multiple regression, variance analysis, experiment design, nonparametric methods, model checking/selection, variable transformation, categorical data analysis, logistic regression.prereq: 3011 or 3021 or SOC 3811

STAT4101 - Theory of Statistics I

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Random variables/distributions. Generating functions. Standard distribution families. Data summaries. Sampling distributions. Likelihood/sufficiency.prereq: Math 1272 or Math 1372 or Math 1572H

STAT4102 - Theory of Statistics II

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Estimation. Significance tests. Distribution free methods. Power. Application to regression and to analysis of variance/count data.prereq: STAT 4101

CHEM2302 - Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: Grade of at least C- in 2301
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and biologically important classes of organic compounds such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids.prereq: Grade of at least C- in 2301

CHEM2332H - Honors Elementary Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Chem 2302/Chem 2304/Chem 2332H
Prerequisites: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Continuation of 2331H. Reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, organic polymers, and their role in biologically important classes of organic molecules such as lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids.prereq: At least C- in 2331H, UHP student

BIOC4025W - Laboratory in Biochemistry (WI)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

Theory, principles, and use of fundamental techniques in modern biochemistry labs.prereq: 3021, 3022, or 4331 or equiv

BIOC4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOC4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL4321W - Deconstructing Research: Writing about Biological Research for Non-scientists (WI)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

Deconstructing Biology Research is designed to help majors in the College of Biological Sciences improve their skills in selecting primary research papers, understanding the experimental approaches taken by the authors of those papers, and evaluating the results and conclusions. Students will then share that knowledge by writing effective deconstructions that explain the research approaches and results for different audiences, including the public at large.

BIOL4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

BIOL4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

COP4793W - Writing Intensive Directed Studies (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

COP4794W - Writing Intensive Directed Research (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.

EEB3408W - Ecology (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3407//Biol 3807/EEB 3407
Typically offered: Every Spring

Principles of population growth/interactions, communities and ecosystem function applied to ecological issues. Regulation of populations, dynamics/impacts of disease, invasions by exotic organisms, biodiversity, global change. Lab. Scientific writing. Quantitative skill development (mathematical models, data analysis, statistics and some coding in R).prereq: [One semester college biology or instr consent], [MATH 1142 or MATH 1271 or Math 1272 or Math 1241 or Math 1242 or MATH 1281 or Math 1282 or equiv]

EEB3412W - Introduction to Animal Behavior, Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: OPT No Aud
Typically offered: Every Spring

EEB 3412W is a lecture/lab writing-intensive course. Why do animals behave the way they do? This question is relevant to conservation, agriculture, human health, veterinary medicine, developing artificial intelligence, and understanding the origins of human behavior. This writing intensive course provides a broad introduction to animal behavior. As one of the most interdisciplinary fields in all of biology, understanding animal behavior requires an understanding of cell biology, physiology, genetics, development, ecology, endocrinology, evolution, learning theory, and even physics and economics! This course will draw on questions and methods from each of these disciplines to answer what on the surface appears to be a very simple question: Why is that animal doing that? The course will review such key topics as feeding behavior, reproductive behavior, perception, learning, animal conflict, social behavior, parental care, and communication. Throughout the course, students will be immersed in the scientific process, reading scientific literature, thinking critically, formulating their own research questions and answering them in an independent project.This is a writing intensive course that covers scientific process and how to formulate research questions.prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB3811W - Animal Behavior in the Field (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: EEB 3411/3811W EEB 3412W/5412
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Summer

In this course we will learn general principles governing the evolution of animal behavior. Being conducted at a fieldstation, the approach is hands-on experiential learning through the application of the scientific method to the study ofanimal behavior. Thus, we will learn animal behavior by becoming animal behaviorists. Animal behaviorists communicateto one another through written reports in peer-reviewed literature and through oral talks at meetings. We will do both ofthese. All of these experiences culminate in the design, execution and presentation (written and oral) of an independentresearch project. Therefore, it is appropriate that this course is designated as writing-intensive. Writing comprises 90points out of the course total of 140 points, representing 64% of the course grade.This is course meets two days per week from 8AM to 12N and from 1PM to 5PM over a 5-week period inMay/June at the Itasca Biological Station and Labs. prereq: Undergrad biology courseCredit granted for only one of the following: EEB 3411, EEB 3412W, EEB 3811W, EEB 5412

EEB4330W - Animal Communication (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Fall Odd Year

Mechanisms of signal production/perception, signal propagation. How signals can convey information. How signalers, signals, receivers are adapted for communication by natural/sexual selection.prereq: (BIOL 1951 or BIOL 1951H or Biol 1009) and (EEB 3412W or EEB 3411 or EEB 3811W)

EEB4609W - Ecosystem Ecology (ENV, WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Regulation of energy and elements cycling through ecosystems. Dependence of cycles on kinds/numbers of species within ecosystems. Effects of human-induced global changes on functioning of ecosystems.

EEB4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

EEB4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

GCD4005W - Cell Biology-Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 4004/GCD 4005W
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Processes fundamental to cells. Emphasizes eukaryotic cells. Assembly/function of membranes/organelles. Cell division, cell form/movement, intercellular communication, transport, secretion pathways. Cancer cells, differentiated cells.prereq: GCD major, Biol2003/2003H or Biol4003 or grad

GCD4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

GCD4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

MICB4161W - Eukaryotic Microbiology (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Cell biology of higher eukaryotes, animal/plant pathogenesis, evolution, industrial microbiology. Tetrahymena/Chlamydomons/Paramecium/Toxoplasma/Aspergillus/ Neurospora.prereq: Biol 4003

MICB4225W - Advanced Laboratory: Microbial Genetics (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: GCD 4015/Micb 4225
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Fall

Yeast is used as a model organism for microbial molecular genetic principles and methods such as ultraviolet mutagenesis, isolation and creation of mutant strains, plasmid design and construction, PCR, Sanger sequencing, gene replacement, and bioinformatics. Students will design and execute their own independent research project using hands-on experimentation with advanced molecular methodsprereq: MicB 3301 and [Biol 4003 or permission]; priority for seats from waitlist to graduating Microbiology majors

MICB4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

MICB4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 15.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor.prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793, 4794, 4993W, 4994W counts towards CBS major requirements.

NSCI3001W - Neuroscience and Society (CIV, WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

Ethical implications. Readings, personal reflections, class discussions, debates, and formal writing. Development of logical arguments, writing skills, oral presentation skills, and teamwork. Students present/argue both their own personal views and those of others. What it is like to have altered mentation, i.e. a brain disease or disability. Readings/multimedia reports from primary neuroscience literature as well as philosophy, policy, and law literature and popular media.

NSCI3102W - Neurobiology II: Perception and Behavior (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: Biol 3102W/NSci 3102W
Grading Basis: A-F or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall & Spring

This is the second of the introductory neurobiology courses. It introduces fundamental concepts in systems and behavioral neuroscience with emphasis on the neural circuits underlying perception and sensorimotor integration. Lectures will examine the neural basis of specific behaviors arising from the oculomotor, visual and auditory systems and notes are available on Canvas. Topics include: retinal processing, functional organization in the cerebral cortex, neural circuit development, language, reward, and addiction. Students must learn to read scientific papers, and to understand the main ideas well enough to synthesize them and communicate them both orally and in writing. The course is writing intensive: exams are in essay and short answer format, and a 10-15 page term paper is required. The course is required for students majoring in neuroscience. The course consists of two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.

NSCI3505W - Mind and Brain (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Grading Basis: A-F only
Typically offered: Every Spring

This course is intended as an introduction to the new views on the relationship between mind and brain. Over the last several decades, a new view of cognition and neural processing has been developed based on the concepts of al¬gorithm, representation, computation, and information processing. Within this theoretical frame¬work, psychological constructs are computational processes occur¬ring across physical neural systems. We will take a neuroscience and psychological perspective in which the physical neuroscience instantiates but does not diminish the psychological constructs. Although our conceptual framework will be computational, this course will not require or expect any mathematical or computer background. At the completion of this class, you will understand the implications of the physical nature of the brain ? how mentation is explicable from physical processes, and how decision-making arises from those same physical processes. Importantly, you will also understand the limitations of current knowledge and the methodologies being used to push those limitations. This class is not intended as a final step in this understanding, but as a first step into these issues. At the conclusion of the class, you should have sufficient understanding to continue more in-depth reading and study in these issues. There are no official prerequisites. However, I have found that students who have EITHER a strong computational background (computer science, mathematics, economics, physics) OR have taken an introductory neuroscience course (e.g. Nsci 2100) have done better in the class than students with no background. However, I have seen students come in with very little background and do well in the class if they engage with the class and work hard.

NSCI4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Individual study of selected topics. Emphasis on readings, use of scientific literature. Writing intensive.prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements

NSCI4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -6.0 [max 42.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N or Aud
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Lab or field investigation of selected areas of research. Writing intensive.prereq: instr consent, dept consent; no more than 7 cr of [4793, 4794, 4993, 4994] may count toward major requirements

PMB3005W - Plant Function Laboratory (WI)

Credits: 2.0 [max 2.0]
Typically offered: Every Spring

In this lab course, students will use a variety of biological techniques to study plant structure and anatomy, plant physiology, cell biology, and plant growth. This includes topics related to climate change, plant adaptation, crop domestication, and genetic engineering. Includes hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus.While this course is paired with the PMB3002 lecture course, the courses do not need to be taken together or in a specific order.Prereq: BIOL 1009, BIOL 2003, or equiv.

PMB3007W - Plant, Algal, and Fungal Diversity and Adaptation (WI)

Credits: 4.0 [max 4.0]
Typically offered: Every Fall

Evolution/Ecology/Diversity of plants, fungi, and algae. Lectures highlight phylogenetic diversity among and within multiple eukaryotic groups as well as adaptations and strategies for survival in varied environments. Includes both hands-on laboratory activities and writing focus.prereq: One semester college biology

PMB4516W - Plant Cell Biology: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 3.0 [max 3.0]
Course Equivalencies: PMB 4516W/ PMB 5516
Typically offered: Periodic Spring

In this course, we will cover current important research topics in plant cell biology. We will cover many plant-specific topics such as gravitropism, plant cell wall biosynthesis, structure and function, plasmodesmatal connections, signal transduction, tip growth, plant cytokinesis, cell energetics. We will also cover some topics that are important for both plant, fungal, and animal cell biology such as cell polarity, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, and the secretory system. Since we will be using recent literature as the course text, some important and classic cell biology topics will not be covered. In the field of cell biology, new discoveries are often the result of improvements in technology especially in imaging, so we will cover some recent advances in methodology. This is also a writing class with the goal of helping students become familiar and comfortable with writing in a scientific style. There will be writing instruction and there will be some reading assignments on scientific writing. There are no enforced prerequisites. Introductory courses on plants, genetics, and biochemistry are helpful.

PMB4793W - Directed Studies: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Studies is an individual-study, literature-based investigation in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. One main feature of this course is that the student will receive writing instruction and the written output of the course will be revised during the semester. The project needs to be explained in a research/directed studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

PMB4794W - Directed Research: Writing Intensive (WI)

Credits: 1.0 -7.0 [max 7.0]
Course Equivalencies: BioC 4793W/Biol 4793W/EEB 4793
Grading Basis: S-N only
Typically offered: Every Fall, Spring & Summer

Writing Intensive Directed Research is an individual-study, laboratory or field research experience in which the student is mentored directly by a faculty member. This course is intended for students who already have initiated a research project in the lab of the mentor and already have results. In this course the student will receive writing instruction. The written output usually is in the form of a scientific paper describing the results of the student's project. Written output of the course must be revised during the semester and a schedule for writing, assessment and revision needs to be in place at the beginning of the semester. The project needs to be explained in a Research/Directed Studies contract and agreed on by both the student and faculty mentor. The contract must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) for the major before the student is allowed to register. The contract includes a description of learning objectives for the course, how writing instruction will take place, a timeline for when student writing will be handed in and how it will be assessed, methodology to be used by the student, and how assessment of learning will be conducted by the mentor. Additional oversight is established for this course - near the end of the semester the written output is submitted to the DUGS for the major. The DUGS is responsible to determine that the writing meets standards set by the CBS Education Policy Committee for quality of writing, appropriate citation of literature, well-constructed figures, tables, and legends (if present), appropriate use and interpretation of statistics (if present), conclusions that are supported by evidence, and well-formatted references. The DUGS can call for a final revision before a grade is given. This course is graded S/N and approval of the DUGS is required before a grade of S can be given by the faculty mentor. prereq: department consent, instructor consent, no more than 7 credits of 4793W, 4794W, 4993, 4994 counts towards CBS major requirements.

(Video) 2022 Global Gopher Experiences: Preparing for your Academic Advising Meeting

FAQs

What programs is University of Minnesota known for? ›

The most popular majors at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities include: Social Sciences; Biological and Biomedical Sciences; Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services; Engineering; Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services; Psychology; Education; Health Professions and Related Programs ...

What do college catalogs contain? ›

The largest part of the College Catalog is descriptions of the courses and programs, but the Catalog also contains important information about college policies, admissions requirements, and financial aid and learning resources.

Does the University of Minnesota have a good education program? ›

#13 Best Public Education Graduate School. #22 Best Education Graduate School.

What is MyU UMN? ›

MyU is the University's enterprise portal. The purpose of MyU is to help people be successful getting their business done at the U. A learning tool for canvas called MyU Canvas provides quick access to the Canvas dashboard under the Academics Tab on MyU.

What is the most popular major in University of Minnesota? ›

The most popular majors at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities include: Social Sciences; Biological and Biomedical Sciences; Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services; Engineering; Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services; Psychology; Education; Health Professions and Related Programs ...

What is the average GPA for University of Minnesota? ›

Average GPA: 3.83

The average GPA at University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is 3.83. (Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA.

What is a university catalog? ›

It includes degree requirements for the College and each school, and the academic and administrative policies that govern students. The Catalog outlines essential information about registration, financial aid, and academic advising. It also describes many student services, activities, and resources.

What is the purpose of a college catalog? ›

What Is a Catalog? All institutions have a detailed catalog (or "bulletin") compiled by the Office of the Registrar that lists all program and graduation requirements at the institution. This is a legal document — a kind of contract with your student.

What is a academic catalog? ›

What is the Academic Catalog? The Academic Catalog is the sum total of all the policies and procedures of how the university and its individual units interact with a student academically. This covers everything from admission to graduation, and includes topics such as residency and academic integrity.

Is University of Minnesota a top University? ›

Already well known as one of America's leading research universities, the University of Minnesota's status as one of the nation's most exceptional and accessible universities was solidified recently in the 2023 U.S. News and World Report rankings.

What are US Tier 1 universities? ›

  • Texas A & M University College Station, Texas. ...
  • Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...
  • Northeastern University Boston, Massachusetts. ...
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...
  • Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona. ...
  • The University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago, Illinois.

Is University of Minnesota a public ivy? ›

The University of Minnesota is one of America's Public Ivy universities, which refers to top public universities in the United States capable of providing a collegiate experience comparable with the Ivy League.

What is Minnesota best known for? ›

The state is known as the Land of 10,000 lakes, which is the highest number of any state in the United States. Minnesota is also famous for being the home of Mall of America, the largest shopping mall in the United States; and its outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, fishing, and winter activities.

Is Minnesota a good state to live in? ›

(FOX 9) - A new survey from the personal finance website WalletHub ranks Minnesota as the ninth-best state to live in for 2022. The survey awards a total of 100 possible points to each state in five different categories worth 20 points each: affordability, economy, education, quality of life, and safety.

Is Minneapolis a good place to live? ›

The Minneapolis-St. Paul area is an excellent place to live, thanks to its growing economy, affordable housing, family-friendly activities, budding arts community, and more! In addition, Minneapolis has one of the best downtown areas for raising a family and is one of the best cities for veterans.

What is the hardest college to get into at University of Minnesota? ›

Based on an index of admissions rates and SAT scores, Carleton College ranks as the hardest school in Minnesota to get into. In the 2020-2021 school year, a reported 21.2% of all 6,892 applicants were admitted.

How much is tuition at the University of Minnesota per year? ›

How many students are at the University of Minnesota? ›

Is UMN a hard school? ›

Although there are plenty of resources for those who struggle academically, the students are definitely still expected to work hard. UMN-Twin Cities is a school that emphasizes hard work and dedication. The courses are designed to reward those who study and truly want to and try to do well.

What is the lowest GPA University of Minnesota will accept? ›

Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher. This cumulative GPA includes coursework from all colleges you have attended.

Can I get into University of Minnesota with a 2.5 GPA? ›

Minimum requirements:

Currently an admitted, degree-seeking undergraduate (with full-time enrollment) at the University of Minnesota Rochester. Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale) - some institutions require a higher GPA.

What is a catalog course description? ›

For the catalog, a course description includes a course prefix, course number, course title, lecture and lab contact hours (if applicable), semester credit hours, description of the content of the course, any prerequisites or corequisites, and any cross-listings.

What is a catalog number in college? ›

These numbers are the main way colleges organize their course catalog. No two courses at a college will share the exact same course number. The most useful thing for students to understand about these numbers is how to distinguish between upper-level credit and lower-level credit.

What is a course guide? ›

A Course Guide functions much like a good course syllabus, but might be even broader in the information it provides. Learners should be able to easily find and access the Course Guide at all times. Be strategic when deciding where to place the course guide.

Do colleges still have catalogs? ›

Each school's catalog is different, but most contain the essential information for students. Some schools still publish a “hard copy” of the catalog and some schools publish their catalog in digital format only.

What is a course catalog at a community college or university? ›

The college catalog is more than a document for students in a utilitarian way, however. It is a legal document whereby the college informs students about policies both at the college and state level.

What is a course load? ›

Definition of course load

: the total of high school or college courses someone is taking I have a light/full course load this semester.

What is a course numbering system? ›

The Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID) is a statewide numbering system, signaling that participating California community colleges and universities have determined that courses offered by other California community colleges are comparable in content and scope to courses offered on their own campuses.

What is the definition of a credit hour? ›

A credit hour is the unit of measurement used to indicate the amount of instructional and learning time required to achieve the student learning outcomes of a college-level course.

What is the purpose of the online catalog at CCBC? ›

The catalog lists all approved credit degree and certificate programs, curriculum requirements, course descriptions and all of CCBC's academic policies and procedures. In addition, information about Continuing Education offerings can also be found in the catalog.

What is the biggest public University in the US? ›

Ten largest public university campuses by enrollment during the 2019–20 academic year
RankingUniversityLocation
1University of Central FloridaOrlando, Florida
2Texas A&M UniversityCollege Station, Texas
3Ohio State UniversityColumbus, Ohio
7 more rows

What is the U of Minnesota acceptance rate? ›

What GPA do you need to transfer to U of MN? ›

Transfer Application Requirements

Minimum GPA: A minimum college grade point average of 2.00 is required of transfer applicants.

What is the richest university in America? ›

Topping the list at about $53 billion, Harvard has the largest endowment among National Universities at the end of fiscal year 2021, according to data collected by U.S. News in an annual survey.

Which is No 1 university in world? ›

Top 100 Universities in the World According to the QS World University Rankings 2023
RankUniversityLocation
1Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)United States
2University of CambridgeUnited Kingdom
3Stanford UniversityUnited States
97 more rows

Is a Tier 2 university good? ›

Tier 2. These schools are still highly competitive, but less so than tier 1. They generally have acceptance rates below 20%.

What is the best Public Ivy? ›

However, the following five schools are widely considered the cream of the crop when it comes to Public Ivies:
  • University of California, Berkeley.
  • University of California, Los Angeles.
  • University of Michigan.
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  • University of Virginia.
9 Sept 2022

What is the best Ivy League school? ›

The best Ivy League school in 2022 is Harvard, followed by Princeton and Yale based on this ranking method. The most notable changes in rankings compared to last year is Columbia dropping below Princeton, U Penn and Yale.

Why should I go to the University of Minnesota? ›

Students who want nothing less than a degree from a flagship school revered for its programs in Business, Engineering, and Nursing will find the University of Minnesota a good fit. The school is also ideal for those who want to study on a very big campus with a large and diverse student body.

Who is the most famous person from Minnesota? ›

The 10 most famous people from Minnesota
  • Singer and songwriter Prince.
  • Author F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • Actor Josh Hartnett.
  • Actress and singer Judy Garland.
  • “Peanuts” cartoonist Charles Shulz.
  • Singer-songwriter Bob Dylan.
  • Actor Seann William Scott.
  • Novelist and playwright Sinclair Lewis.

How many billionaires live in Minnesota? ›

Table
Rank by number of billionaires (9/15/20)State or federal districtBillionaires/ State's 10M pop. (7/19 census) (9/15/20)
31Minnesota5.32
20Oklahoma15.16
23Arkansas16.57
27Indiana4.46
49 more rows

What state is most similar to Minnesota? ›

Wisconsin is by far the most similar state to Minnesota. In fact, it is the most similar in demographics, culture, infrastructure, and geography.

What is a good salary in Minneapolis? ›

While ZipRecruiter is seeing salaries as high as $85,806 and as low as $24,732, the majority of salaries within the Comfortable jobs category currently range between $29,275 (25th percentile) to $45,931 (75th percentile) with top earners (90th percentile) making $65,616 annually in Minneapolis.

Is St. Paul safer than Minneapolis? ›

St. Paul has a higher crime rate than the state and national averages, both in violent and property crimes. It has a lower crime rate than Minneapolis.

Is it better to live in St. Paul or Minneapolis? ›

St. Paul is the capitol of Minnesota, but it feels like the sleepier of the two cities. Lets compare them just in size – Minneapolis has about 437,000 residents in the city itself while St.
...
More videos on YouTube.
Hennepin County Property Tax Rate (MPLS)1.36%
National Average Property Tax Rate1.15%
2 more rows
29 Nov 2020

What is Minnesota known for? ›

The state is known as the Land of 10,000 lakes, which is the highest number of any state in the United States. Minnesota is also famous for being the home of Mall of America, the largest shopping mall in the United States; and its outdoor activities, including hiking, camping, fishing, and winter activities.

Is University of Minnesota prestigious? ›

Across the US, there's no denying that UMN is one of the most well-known and prestigious public institutions. As a matter of fact, College Simply ranks it #25 in Best Public Colleges in the US. It's also #25 in Top Public Universities in America by Niche.

Is University of Minnesota Ivy League? ›

Minnesota is one of America's Public Ivy universities, which refers to top public universities in the United States capable of providing a collegiate experience comparable with the Ivy League.

What GPA do you need to transfer to U of MN? ›

Transfer Application Requirements

Minimum GPA: A minimum college grade point average of 2.00 is required of transfer applicants.

Who is the most famous person from Minnesota? ›

The 10 most famous people from Minnesota
  • Singer and songwriter Prince.
  • Author F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • Actor Josh Hartnett.
  • Actress and singer Judy Garland.
  • “Peanuts” cartoonist Charles Shulz.
  • Singer-songwriter Bob Dylan.
  • Actor Seann William Scott.
  • Novelist and playwright Sinclair Lewis.

What do you call a person from Minnesota? ›

Those who make a home in Minnesota are Minnesotans.

What food is famous in Minnesota? ›

Wild rice. Fun fact: Wild rice is the state grain of Minnesota. From soups to pancakes, there's nothing better than locally harvested wild rice to give you a hearty, flavorful meal.

Who is the No 1 University in world? ›

List of top 1000 universities in the world
UniversityCountryARWU 2021
Harvard UniversityUnited States1
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)United States4
Stanford UniversityUnited States2
University of OxfordUnited Kingdom7
54 more rows

What is the most prestigious college in MN? ›

Here are the best colleges in Minnesota
  • University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.
  • University of St. Thomas (MN)
  • Bethel University (MN)
  • The College of St. Scholastica.
  • St. Catherine University.
  • Saint Mary's University of Minnesota.
  • Carleton College.
  • Macalester College.

Is UMN a dry campus? ›

It was last updated in 2013 and applies to all five campuses of the University of Minnesota. The guiding principles are around compliance, education, counseling, and health and safety.” This means that no alcohol is allowed anywhere on campus. However, alcohol is permitted at events if approved by the chancellor.

What is the #1 college in Minnesota? ›

The highest ranked college in Minnesota is Carleton College and the top rated public state college is University of Minnesota Twin Cities.

What is the #1 public university in the US? ›

11, 2022 11:16 p.m. UCLA tied with UC Berkeley for first place on the U.S News & World Report's public university rankings, earning the No. 1 ranking for the sixth year in a row but breaking its four-year streak as the sole university at the top spot.

What is the lowest GPA University of Minnesota will accept? ›

Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher. This cumulative GPA includes coursework from all colleges you have attended.

Can I get into University of Minnesota with a 3.5 GPA? ›

Estimated GPA Requirements & Average GPA

Applicants require exceptionally good grades to get into Minnesota. The average high school GPA of the admitted freshman class at University of Minnesota Twin Cities was 3.75 on the 4.0 scale indicating that primarily A- students are accepted and ultimately attend.

What is the acceptance rate for University of Minnesota? ›

Videos

1. Online Course Catalog
(OmniUpdate)
2. Transfer Within the University Information Session
(College of Biological Sciences)
3. University of Minnesota | Recommender Systems MOOC
(James Ondrey)
4. 06/07/2021 Global Gopher Student Webinar 2 Orientation & Registration
(ISSS at the University of Minnesota)
5. 1989 University of Minnesota Libraries Orientation
(umnLibraries)
6. Class Permission Numbers
(ASR Training & Support at the University of Minnesota)

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